Flexure and isostatic residual gravity of the Sierra Nevada

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Sierra Nevada of California displays an isostatic gravity anomaly of +35mGal over the western foothills and -45mGal at the crest of the range. A flexural isostatic model designed to explain the rapid Neogene uplift of the Sierra Nevada is consistent with these observations and can explain a portion of both gravity anomalies by contributions from Moho depths. The present-day crustal root causing regional compensation in this model differs from the simple local Airy compensation assumed for the Sierra in calculating the isostatic residual gravity. Two-dimensional gravity modeling indicates that this difference results in a residual gravity high of +9mGals over the western foothills, which are buoyed up by the excess root to the east, and a low of -16mGals over the crest of the Sierra. The remainder of the isostatic gravity anomaly is attributed to upper crustal density contrasts because high-density rocks underlie the foothills, and a low-density batholith forms the crest. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1759-1764
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research
Volume94
Issue numberB2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1989

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gravity anomalies
flexing
flexure
gravity anomaly
gravity
Gravitation
gravitation
crustal root
high gravity environments
batholith
Moho
Neogene
uplift
rocks
rock
modeling
Sierra Nevada (California)
Rocks

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geophysics
  • Forestry
  • Oceanography
  • Aquatic Science
  • Ecology
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Soil Science
  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Earth-Surface Processes
  • Atmospheric Science
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Palaeontology

Cite this

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title = "Flexure and isostatic residual gravity of the Sierra Nevada",
abstract = "The Sierra Nevada of California displays an isostatic gravity anomaly of +35mGal over the western foothills and -45mGal at the crest of the range. A flexural isostatic model designed to explain the rapid Neogene uplift of the Sierra Nevada is consistent with these observations and can explain a portion of both gravity anomalies by contributions from Moho depths. The present-day crustal root causing regional compensation in this model differs from the simple local Airy compensation assumed for the Sierra in calculating the isostatic residual gravity. Two-dimensional gravity modeling indicates that this difference results in a residual gravity high of +9mGals over the western foothills, which are buoyed up by the excess root to the east, and a low of -16mGals over the crest of the Sierra. The remainder of the isostatic gravity anomaly is attributed to upper crustal density contrasts because high-density rocks underlie the foothills, and a low-density batholith forms the crest. -from Authors",
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Flexure and isostatic residual gravity of the Sierra Nevada. / Kennelly, Patrick Joseph; Chase, C. G.

In: Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 94, No. B2, 01.01.1989, p. 1759-1764.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Flexure and isostatic residual gravity of the Sierra Nevada

AU - Kennelly, Patrick Joseph

AU - Chase, C. G.

PY - 1989/1/1

Y1 - 1989/1/1

N2 - The Sierra Nevada of California displays an isostatic gravity anomaly of +35mGal over the western foothills and -45mGal at the crest of the range. A flexural isostatic model designed to explain the rapid Neogene uplift of the Sierra Nevada is consistent with these observations and can explain a portion of both gravity anomalies by contributions from Moho depths. The present-day crustal root causing regional compensation in this model differs from the simple local Airy compensation assumed for the Sierra in calculating the isostatic residual gravity. Two-dimensional gravity modeling indicates that this difference results in a residual gravity high of +9mGals over the western foothills, which are buoyed up by the excess root to the east, and a low of -16mGals over the crest of the Sierra. The remainder of the isostatic gravity anomaly is attributed to upper crustal density contrasts because high-density rocks underlie the foothills, and a low-density batholith forms the crest. -from Authors

AB - The Sierra Nevada of California displays an isostatic gravity anomaly of +35mGal over the western foothills and -45mGal at the crest of the range. A flexural isostatic model designed to explain the rapid Neogene uplift of the Sierra Nevada is consistent with these observations and can explain a portion of both gravity anomalies by contributions from Moho depths. The present-day crustal root causing regional compensation in this model differs from the simple local Airy compensation assumed for the Sierra in calculating the isostatic residual gravity. Two-dimensional gravity modeling indicates that this difference results in a residual gravity high of +9mGals over the western foothills, which are buoyed up by the excess root to the east, and a low of -16mGals over the crest of the Sierra. The remainder of the isostatic gravity anomaly is attributed to upper crustal density contrasts because high-density rocks underlie the foothills, and a low-density batholith forms the crest. -from Authors

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