Fluoroscopy pulse rate reduction during diagnostic and therapeutic imaging in the cardiac catheterization laboratory: An evaluation of radiation dose, procedure complications and outcomes

James W. Hansen, Andrew Foy, Torrey Schmidt, Mehrdad Ghahramani, Charles Chambers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: To evaluate radiation reduction by reducing fluoroscopy pulse rate in diagnostic cardiac catheterizations and percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) as well as outcomes at 30 days and six months. Background: Radiation exposure to the public at large has increased dramatically over the past three decades, and the cardiac catheterization laboratory is a large contributor. Fluoroscopy pulse rate is one way to decrease radiation exposure. Methods: Fluoroscopy pulse rate was reduced from 10 pulses/sec (p/s) to 7.5 p/s as part of an internal quality improvement project. A retrospective analysis of all cardiac catheterizations was performed, evaluating Air KERMA at the interventional reference point (K a, r ), Air KERMA area product (P KA ), procedural complications and major adverse cardiac events at 30 days and 6 months. Results: In diagnostic catheterization median P KA (µGy·m 2 ) and K a,r (mGy) were significantly reduced (P KA – 5,613.3 vs. 4,400, P < 0.001; K a,r – 703.0 vs. 621.0, P = 0.041). In PCI, median P KA and K a,r were further reduced (P KA – 13,481.6 vs. 10,648.0, P < 0.001; K a,r – 1787.0 vs. 1,459.0, P = 0.002). There was no difference in complications, fluoroscopy time or number of stents placed. There was no difference in MACE after adjustment for number of STEMIs. Conclusions: Reducing fluoroscopy pulse rates to 7.5 from 10 is an effective way to reduce patient radiation exposure across meaningful dose indices. A pulse rate of 7.5 p/s is safe, with no difference in complications or outcomes. A fluoroscopy pulse rate of 7.5 p/s should be given strong consideration for a new standard.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)665-670
Number of pages6
JournalCatheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions
Volume89
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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