For the birds: Media sourcing, Twitter, and the minimal effect on audience perceptions

Anne Oeldorf-Hirsch, Michael Grant Schmierbach, Alyssa Appelman, Michael P. Boyle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Twitter has emerged as a key news source, but questions remain about the ethics of relying on it as a source and the implications of such reliance for audience impressions. Two experiments test perceptions of news attributed to Twitter. Study 1 (N = 699) tests the effects of quoting from Twitter and showing actual tweets. The results suggest minimal influences on credibility or quality perceptions. Study 2 (N = 311) tests the equivalence of quotes attributed to various sources and investigates the effects of attributing the origin of a news story to Twitter. Results suggest that visual representations of tweets may have a negative effect, but otherwise perceptual effects remain minimal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalConvergence
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

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twitter
Birds
news
Experiments
equivalence
credibility
moral philosophy
Sourcing
experiment
News

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Communication
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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For the birds : Media sourcing, Twitter, and the minimal effect on audience perceptions. / Oeldorf-Hirsch, Anne; Schmierbach, Michael Grant; Appelman, Alyssa; Boyle, Michael P.

In: Convergence, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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