Forced to move: Patterns and predictors of residential displacement during an era of housing insecurity

Barrett A. Lee, Megan Evans

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (SciVal)

Abstract

Recent work on residential displacement—being forced out of one's home—hints that its nature and prevalence have changed during the early twenty-first century. We evaluate this supposition against the backdrop of past displacement research. Reason-for-move data from seven waves of the American Housing Survey (2001-2013) are used to construct displacement measures that range from narrow (limited to forced moves prompted by government or private action or disaster loss) to broad (also including eviction and foreclosure). Our analysis shows that, regardless of measure, no consistent upward trend over time is apparent in the small percentage of mobile households experiencing displacement, although as many as 3.6 million individuals may be affected biennially. We also find that longstanding socioeconomic, racial, and other disparities in displacement persist but tend to be of modest magnitude. Such patterns could contribute to a perception of displacement as socially unpredictable, further heightening public concern about the issue.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number102415
JournalSocial Science Research
Volume87
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Sociology and Political Science

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