Foreign investment and environment in a North-South model with cross-border pollution

Valerica Vlad, Sajal Lahiri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We develop a North-South model with cross-border pollution. In the South, pollution is abated by both private producers and the public sector. The North suffers from cross-border pollution from the South. The policy instruments are foreign aid for the North, and funds for public abatement, emission tax rate, and a tax on foreign capital, for the South. We characterize the Nash equilibrium under two scenarios: foreign investment is (i) exogenous, and (ii) endogenous. Under (i), we examine the effect of a reform where both foreign investment and aid are changed in an income-neutral way. In the latter case, we analyze the effect of a tax-induced change in foreign investment on pollution. In both scenarios, an inflow of foreign investment unambiguously reduces the net emission of pollution.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-18
Number of pages18
JournalAsia-Pacific Journal of Accounting and Economics
Volume16
Issue number1
StatePublished - Apr 1 2009

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Pollution
Foreign investment
Cross-border
Scenarios
Tax
Foreign aid
Foreign capital
Income
Policy instruments
Nash equilibrium
Abatement
Emission taxes
Public sector
Tax rate

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Accounting
  • Finance
  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

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Foreign investment and environment in a North-South model with cross-border pollution. / Vlad, Valerica; Lahiri, Sajal.

In: Asia-Pacific Journal of Accounting and Economics, Vol. 16, No. 1, 01.04.2009, p. 1-18.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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