Formality identification in social media dialogue

Partha Mukherjee, Bernard J. Jansen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Researching second screen interactions that form a social soundtrack concerning a major broadcast media event, we perform statistical analysis on more than 800 K postings and 50 K blogs of Super Bowl XLIX on Instagram and Tumblr respectively for three categories (commercials, music and game) during three phrases (Pre, During, and Post) identifying the influence of different social soundtrack features of the postings on formality of contents during three phrases (Pre, During, and Post). For Instagram, the positive influence of URL-based postings in relative scale on formality is significant, but other features have significant negative impact in Pre and Post phases. For Tumblr, undirected broadcast pattern of conversation and number of sentences in relative scale in Pre and Post phases have a positive influence on formality. The During phase does not show any significant influence between any of the social soundtrack feature and formality of the postings for either Instagram or Tumblr. It is important to note that formality is significantly increased on Instagram, but it exhibits significant reduction on Tumblr. We further evaluate the effects of categories on top of the influence of social interaction features on contents of social media platforms for a fixed effects model. For Instagram’s formality aspect, the fixed effects estimate of the game category significantly outperforms the other two categories in all three phases, while for Tumblr, the music category fixed effects plays the lead role in Pre and Post phases. These results assist in identifying the strength of linkage among broadcast categories, social media postings, and inherent formality, providing insights into viewer reactions to the broadcast of In-Real Life events.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationSocial, Cultural, and Behavioral Modeling - 9th International Conference, SBP-BRiMS 2016, Proceedings
EditorsNathaniel Osgood, Kevin S. Xu, David Reitter, Dongwon Lee
PublisherSpringer Verlag
Pages13-22
Number of pages10
ISBN (Print)9783319399300
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016
Event9th International Conference on Social Computing, Behavioral-Cultural Modeling, and Prediction and Behavior Representation in Modeling and Simulation, SBP-BRiMS 2016 - Washington, United States
Duration: Jun 28 2016Jul 1 2016

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume9708 LNCS
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

Other

Other9th International Conference on Social Computing, Behavioral-Cultural Modeling, and Prediction and Behavior Representation in Modeling and Simulation, SBP-BRiMS 2016
CountryUnited States
CityWashington
Period6/28/167/1/16

Fingerprint

Formality
Social Media
Blogs
Websites
Statistical methods
Broadcast
Fixed Effects
Music
Game
Fixed Effects Model
Social Interaction
Dialogue
Linkage
Statistical Analysis
Influence
Evaluate
Interaction
Estimate

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Theoretical Computer Science
  • Computer Science(all)

Cite this

Mukherjee, P., & Jansen, B. J. (2016). Formality identification in social media dialogue. In N. Osgood, K. S. Xu, D. Reitter, & D. Lee (Eds.), Social, Cultural, and Behavioral Modeling - 9th International Conference, SBP-BRiMS 2016, Proceedings (pp. 13-22). (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 9708 LNCS). Springer Verlag. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-39931-7_2
Mukherjee, Partha ; Jansen, Bernard J. / Formality identification in social media dialogue. Social, Cultural, and Behavioral Modeling - 9th International Conference, SBP-BRiMS 2016, Proceedings. editor / Nathaniel Osgood ; Kevin S. Xu ; David Reitter ; Dongwon Lee. Springer Verlag, 2016. pp. 13-22 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)).
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Mukherjee, P & Jansen, BJ 2016, Formality identification in social media dialogue. in N Osgood, KS Xu, D Reitter & D Lee (eds), Social, Cultural, and Behavioral Modeling - 9th International Conference, SBP-BRiMS 2016, Proceedings. Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), vol. 9708 LNCS, Springer Verlag, pp. 13-22, 9th International Conference on Social Computing, Behavioral-Cultural Modeling, and Prediction and Behavior Representation in Modeling and Simulation, SBP-BRiMS 2016, Washington, United States, 6/28/16. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-39931-7_2

Formality identification in social media dialogue. / Mukherjee, Partha; Jansen, Bernard J.

Social, Cultural, and Behavioral Modeling - 9th International Conference, SBP-BRiMS 2016, Proceedings. ed. / Nathaniel Osgood; Kevin S. Xu; David Reitter; Dongwon Lee. Springer Verlag, 2016. p. 13-22 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 9708 LNCS).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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AU - Jansen, Bernard J.

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N2 - Researching second screen interactions that form a social soundtrack concerning a major broadcast media event, we perform statistical analysis on more than 800 K postings and 50 K blogs of Super Bowl XLIX on Instagram and Tumblr respectively for three categories (commercials, music and game) during three phrases (Pre, During, and Post) identifying the influence of different social soundtrack features of the postings on formality of contents during three phrases (Pre, During, and Post). For Instagram, the positive influence of URL-based postings in relative scale on formality is significant, but other features have significant negative impact in Pre and Post phases. For Tumblr, undirected broadcast pattern of conversation and number of sentences in relative scale in Pre and Post phases have a positive influence on formality. The During phase does not show any significant influence between any of the social soundtrack feature and formality of the postings for either Instagram or Tumblr. It is important to note that formality is significantly increased on Instagram, but it exhibits significant reduction on Tumblr. We further evaluate the effects of categories on top of the influence of social interaction features on contents of social media platforms for a fixed effects model. For Instagram’s formality aspect, the fixed effects estimate of the game category significantly outperforms the other two categories in all three phases, while for Tumblr, the music category fixed effects plays the lead role in Pre and Post phases. These results assist in identifying the strength of linkage among broadcast categories, social media postings, and inherent formality, providing insights into viewer reactions to the broadcast of In-Real Life events.

AB - Researching second screen interactions that form a social soundtrack concerning a major broadcast media event, we perform statistical analysis on more than 800 K postings and 50 K blogs of Super Bowl XLIX on Instagram and Tumblr respectively for three categories (commercials, music and game) during three phrases (Pre, During, and Post) identifying the influence of different social soundtrack features of the postings on formality of contents during three phrases (Pre, During, and Post). For Instagram, the positive influence of URL-based postings in relative scale on formality is significant, but other features have significant negative impact in Pre and Post phases. For Tumblr, undirected broadcast pattern of conversation and number of sentences in relative scale in Pre and Post phases have a positive influence on formality. The During phase does not show any significant influence between any of the social soundtrack feature and formality of the postings for either Instagram or Tumblr. It is important to note that formality is significantly increased on Instagram, but it exhibits significant reduction on Tumblr. We further evaluate the effects of categories on top of the influence of social interaction features on contents of social media platforms for a fixed effects model. For Instagram’s formality aspect, the fixed effects estimate of the game category significantly outperforms the other two categories in all three phases, while for Tumblr, the music category fixed effects plays the lead role in Pre and Post phases. These results assist in identifying the strength of linkage among broadcast categories, social media postings, and inherent formality, providing insights into viewer reactions to the broadcast of In-Real Life events.

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T3 - Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)

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Mukherjee P, Jansen BJ. Formality identification in social media dialogue. In Osgood N, Xu KS, Reitter D, Lee D, editors, Social, Cultural, and Behavioral Modeling - 9th International Conference, SBP-BRiMS 2016, Proceedings. Springer Verlag. 2016. p. 13-22. (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-39931-7_2