Formation and function of the manganese(iv)/iron(iii) cofactor in chlamydia trachomatis ribonucleotide reductase

Wei Jiang, Danny Yun, Lana Saleh, Joseph M. Bollinger, Jr., Carsten Krebs

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The β2 subunit of a class Ia or Ib ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) is activated when its carboxylate-bridged Fe2 II/II cluster reacts with O2 to oxidize a nearby tyrosine (Y) residue to a stable radical (Y). During turnover, the Y in β2 is thought to reversibly oxidize a cysteine (C) in the α2 subunit to a thiyl radical (C) by a long-distance (∼35 Å) proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) step. The C in α2 then initiates reduction of the 2′ position of the ribonucleoside 5′-diphosphate substrate by abstracting the hydrogen atom from C3′. The class I RNR from Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) is the prototype of a newly recognized subclass (Ic), which is characterized by the presence of a phenylalanine (F) residue at the site of β2 where the essential radical-harboring Y is normally found. We recently demonstrated that Ct RNR employs a heterobinuclear Mn IV/FeIII cluster for radical initiation. In essence, the MnIV ion of the cluster functionally replaces the Y of the conventional class I RNR. The Ct β2 protein also autoactivates by reaction of its reduced (MnII/FeII) metal cluster with O2. In this reaction, an unprecedented MnIV/Fe IV intermediate accumulates almost stoichiometrically and decays by one-electron reduction of the FeIV site. This reduction is mediated by the near-surface residue, Y222, a residue with no functional counterpart in the well-studied conventional class I RNRs. In this review, we recount the discovery of the novel Mn/Fe redox cofactor in Ct RNR and summarize our current understanding of how it assembles and initiates nucleotide reduction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13736-13744
Number of pages9
JournalBiochemistry
Volume47
Issue number52
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 30 2008

Fingerprint

Ribonucleotide Reductases
Chlamydia trachomatis
Manganese
Iron
Electrons
Ribonucleosides
Diphosphates
Phenylalanine
Oxidation-Reduction
Cysteine
Tyrosine
Protons
Hydrogen
Nucleotides
Metals
Ions
Atoms
Substrates
Proteins

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry

Cite this

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title = "Formation and function of the manganese(iv)/iron(iii) cofactor in chlamydia trachomatis ribonucleotide reductase",
abstract = "The β2 subunit of a class Ia or Ib ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) is activated when its carboxylate-bridged Fe2 II/II cluster reacts with O2 to oxidize a nearby tyrosine (Y) residue to a stable radical (Y). During turnover, the Y in β2 is thought to reversibly oxidize a cysteine (C) in the α2 subunit to a thiyl radical (C) by a long-distance (∼35 {\AA}) proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) step. The C in α2 then initiates reduction of the 2′ position of the ribonucleoside 5′-diphosphate substrate by abstracting the hydrogen atom from C3′. The class I RNR from Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) is the prototype of a newly recognized subclass (Ic), which is characterized by the presence of a phenylalanine (F) residue at the site of β2 where the essential radical-harboring Y is normally found. We recently demonstrated that Ct RNR employs a heterobinuclear Mn IV/FeIII cluster for radical initiation. In essence, the MnIV ion of the cluster functionally replaces the Y of the conventional class I RNR. The Ct β2 protein also autoactivates by reaction of its reduced (MnII/FeII) metal cluster with O2. In this reaction, an unprecedented MnIV/Fe IV intermediate accumulates almost stoichiometrically and decays by one-electron reduction of the FeIV site. This reduction is mediated by the near-surface residue, Y222, a residue with no functional counterpart in the well-studied conventional class I RNRs. In this review, we recount the discovery of the novel Mn/Fe redox cofactor in Ct RNR and summarize our current understanding of how it assembles and initiates nucleotide reduction.",
author = "Wei Jiang and Danny Yun and Lana Saleh and {Bollinger, Jr.}, {Joseph M.} and Carsten Krebs",
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Formation and function of the manganese(iv)/iron(iii) cofactor in chlamydia trachomatis ribonucleotide reductase. / Jiang, Wei; Yun, Danny; Saleh, Lana; Bollinger, Jr., Joseph M.; Krebs, Carsten.

In: Biochemistry, Vol. 47, No. 52, 30.12.2008, p. 13736-13744.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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T1 - Formation and function of the manganese(iv)/iron(iii) cofactor in chlamydia trachomatis ribonucleotide reductase

AU - Jiang, Wei

AU - Yun, Danny

AU - Saleh, Lana

AU - Bollinger, Jr., Joseph M.

AU - Krebs, Carsten

PY - 2008/12/30

Y1 - 2008/12/30

N2 - The β2 subunit of a class Ia or Ib ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) is activated when its carboxylate-bridged Fe2 II/II cluster reacts with O2 to oxidize a nearby tyrosine (Y) residue to a stable radical (Y). During turnover, the Y in β2 is thought to reversibly oxidize a cysteine (C) in the α2 subunit to a thiyl radical (C) by a long-distance (∼35 Å) proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) step. The C in α2 then initiates reduction of the 2′ position of the ribonucleoside 5′-diphosphate substrate by abstracting the hydrogen atom from C3′. The class I RNR from Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) is the prototype of a newly recognized subclass (Ic), which is characterized by the presence of a phenylalanine (F) residue at the site of β2 where the essential radical-harboring Y is normally found. We recently demonstrated that Ct RNR employs a heterobinuclear Mn IV/FeIII cluster for radical initiation. In essence, the MnIV ion of the cluster functionally replaces the Y of the conventional class I RNR. The Ct β2 protein also autoactivates by reaction of its reduced (MnII/FeII) metal cluster with O2. In this reaction, an unprecedented MnIV/Fe IV intermediate accumulates almost stoichiometrically and decays by one-electron reduction of the FeIV site. This reduction is mediated by the near-surface residue, Y222, a residue with no functional counterpart in the well-studied conventional class I RNRs. In this review, we recount the discovery of the novel Mn/Fe redox cofactor in Ct RNR and summarize our current understanding of how it assembles and initiates nucleotide reduction.

AB - The β2 subunit of a class Ia or Ib ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) is activated when its carboxylate-bridged Fe2 II/II cluster reacts with O2 to oxidize a nearby tyrosine (Y) residue to a stable radical (Y). During turnover, the Y in β2 is thought to reversibly oxidize a cysteine (C) in the α2 subunit to a thiyl radical (C) by a long-distance (∼35 Å) proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) step. The C in α2 then initiates reduction of the 2′ position of the ribonucleoside 5′-diphosphate substrate by abstracting the hydrogen atom from C3′. The class I RNR from Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) is the prototype of a newly recognized subclass (Ic), which is characterized by the presence of a phenylalanine (F) residue at the site of β2 where the essential radical-harboring Y is normally found. We recently demonstrated that Ct RNR employs a heterobinuclear Mn IV/FeIII cluster for radical initiation. In essence, the MnIV ion of the cluster functionally replaces the Y of the conventional class I RNR. The Ct β2 protein also autoactivates by reaction of its reduced (MnII/FeII) metal cluster with O2. In this reaction, an unprecedented MnIV/Fe IV intermediate accumulates almost stoichiometrically and decays by one-electron reduction of the FeIV site. This reduction is mediated by the near-surface residue, Y222, a residue with no functional counterpart in the well-studied conventional class I RNRs. In this review, we recount the discovery of the novel Mn/Fe redox cofactor in Ct RNR and summarize our current understanding of how it assembles and initiates nucleotide reduction.

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