Formation mechanism for the nanoscale amorphous interface in pulse-welded Al/Fe bimetallic systems

Jingjing Li, Qian Yu, Zijiao Zhang, Wei Xu, Xin Sun

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pulse or impact welding traditionally has been referred to as "solid-state" welding. By integrating advanced interface characterizations and diffusion calculations, we report that the nanoscale amorphous interface in the pulse-welded Al/Fe bimetallic system is formed by rapid heating and melting of a thin Al layer at the interface, diffusion of iron atoms in the liquid aluminum, and subsequent rapid quenching with diffused iron atoms in solution. This finding challenges the commonly held belief regarding the solid-state nature of the impact-based welding process for dissimilar metals. Elongated ultra-fine grains with high dislocation density and ultra-fine equiaxed grains also are observed in the weld interface vicinity on the steel and aluminum sides, respectively, which further confirms that melting and the subsequent recrystallization occurred on the aluminum side of the interface.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number201606
JournalApplied Physics Letters
Volume108
Issue number20
DOIs
StatePublished - May 16 2016

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welding
pulses
aluminum
melting
solid state
iron
atoms
steels
heating
liquids
metals

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physics and Astronomy (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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Formation mechanism for the nanoscale amorphous interface in pulse-welded Al/Fe bimetallic systems. / Li, Jingjing; Yu, Qian; Zhang, Zijiao; Xu, Wei; Sun, Xin.

In: Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 108, No. 20, 201606, 16.05.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Yu, Qian

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AU - Xu, Wei

AU - Sun, Xin

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