Fortified Bomas and Vigilant Herding are Perceived to Reduce Livestock Depredation by Large Carnivores in the Tarangire-Simanjiro Ecosystem, Tanzania

Felix J. Mkonyi, Anna B. Estes, Maurus J. Msuha, Laly L. Lichtenfeld, Sarah M. Durant

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Human-carnivore conflict (HCC) is an increasingly important issue in Tanzania, especially where humans live adjacent to protected areas (PAs). We conducted semi-structured interviews (n = 300) to compile information on livestock husbandry practices and evaluate perceptions about the effectiveness of these methods in the Tarangire-Simanjiro ecosystem of northern Tanzania. Fortified bomas were perceived to be very effective (97.7%) in reducing nighttime depredations, while adult herders were perceived to be effective (71%) in reducing daytime depredations. Domestic dogs were perceived to be more effective at night, but an equal number of respondents found them to be effective during herding as those who found them to be not effective. Our results also show that boma type had a significant effect on livestock depredation. We recommend the use of fortified bomas as a long-term solution to prevent nocturnal livestock loss and adult herders for livestock during the day.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)513-523
Number of pages11
JournalHuman Ecology
Volume45
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2017

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology
  • Anthropology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Environmental Science (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science

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