Fractal random cantor superlattices for the infrared

Jeremy A. Bossard, Timothy M. McManus, Douglas Henry Werner

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Electromagnetics simulation has traditionally been tied to Euclidean geometry, where wave interaction with regular structures such as cylinders, spheres, cones, planes, and edges are considered. These Euclidean geometries can be combined to describe many man-made objects or to approximate complex objects that occur in nature. However, objects in nature contain complex structures that typically appear in multiple length-scales and are not well described using Euclidean geometry. These often spiky, wiggly, irregular structures are better represented by fractal geometry, which was introduced by Mandelbrot in the 1970s in order to describe geometries found in nature [1,2]. While fractal geometry is not rigorously defined, there are some typical characteristics in fractals, such as self-similarity across length-scales, an iterative construction of the fractal geometry, and a tendency to fill up space as many iterations of the geometry are constructed at progressively smaller length-scales [1].

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2010 IEEE International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation and CNC-USNC/URSI Radio Science Meeting - Leading the Wave, AP-S/URSI 2010
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 22 2010
Event2010 IEEE International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation and CNC-USNC/URSI Radio Science Meeting - Leading the Wave, AP-S/URSI 2010 - Toronto, ON, Canada
Duration: Jul 11 2010Jul 17 2010

Publication series

Name2010 IEEE International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation and CNC-USNC/URSI Radio Science Meeting - Leading the Wave, AP-S/URSI 2010

Other

Other2010 IEEE International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation and CNC-USNC/URSI Radio Science Meeting - Leading the Wave, AP-S/URSI 2010
CountryCanada
CityToronto, ON
Period7/11/107/17/10

Fingerprint

Superlattices
Fractals
Infrared radiation
Geometry
Cones

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Hardware and Architecture

Cite this

Bossard, J. A., McManus, T. M., & Werner, D. H. (2010). Fractal random cantor superlattices for the infrared. In 2010 IEEE International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation and CNC-USNC/URSI Radio Science Meeting - Leading the Wave, AP-S/URSI 2010 [5560934] (2010 IEEE International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation and CNC-USNC/URSI Radio Science Meeting - Leading the Wave, AP-S/URSI 2010). https://doi.org/10.1109/APS.2010.5560934
Bossard, Jeremy A. ; McManus, Timothy M. ; Werner, Douglas Henry. / Fractal random cantor superlattices for the infrared. 2010 IEEE International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation and CNC-USNC/URSI Radio Science Meeting - Leading the Wave, AP-S/URSI 2010. 2010. (2010 IEEE International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation and CNC-USNC/URSI Radio Science Meeting - Leading the Wave, AP-S/URSI 2010).
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Bossard, JA, McManus, TM & Werner, DH 2010, Fractal random cantor superlattices for the infrared. in 2010 IEEE International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation and CNC-USNC/URSI Radio Science Meeting - Leading the Wave, AP-S/URSI 2010., 5560934, 2010 IEEE International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation and CNC-USNC/URSI Radio Science Meeting - Leading the Wave, AP-S/URSI 2010, 2010 IEEE International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation and CNC-USNC/URSI Radio Science Meeting - Leading the Wave, AP-S/URSI 2010, Toronto, ON, Canada, 7/11/10. https://doi.org/10.1109/APS.2010.5560934

Fractal random cantor superlattices for the infrared. / Bossard, Jeremy A.; McManus, Timothy M.; Werner, Douglas Henry.

2010 IEEE International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation and CNC-USNC/URSI Radio Science Meeting - Leading the Wave, AP-S/URSI 2010. 2010. 5560934 (2010 IEEE International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation and CNC-USNC/URSI Radio Science Meeting - Leading the Wave, AP-S/URSI 2010).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Bossard JA, McManus TM, Werner DH. Fractal random cantor superlattices for the infrared. In 2010 IEEE International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation and CNC-USNC/URSI Radio Science Meeting - Leading the Wave, AP-S/URSI 2010. 2010. 5560934. (2010 IEEE International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation and CNC-USNC/URSI Radio Science Meeting - Leading the Wave, AP-S/URSI 2010). https://doi.org/10.1109/APS.2010.5560934