Frequency and Intensity of Emotional Expressiveness and Preschool Children’s Peer Competence

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Children’s emotional expressiveness with peers was examined as a predictor of social competence. Data were collected from 122 preschool children (57 boys, 65 girls; 86 European American, 9 African American, 17 Hispanic, and 10 other ethnicity) over a period of two years. Observations of children’s peer interactions in Year 1 were coded for frequency and intensity of happiness, anger, sadness, and fear. Sociometric interviews and teacher ratings provided assessments of children’s peer competence in both Years 1 and 2. Frequent expression of happiness in Year 1 predicted higher social competence scores in Year 2, whereas frequent anger in Year 1 predicted lower peer competence Year 2. More intense anger and sadness in Year 1 predicted lower peer social competence scores in Year 2. Frequency and intensity of emotional expressiveness in Year 1 accounted for unique variance in peer competence in Year 2.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)45-61
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Genetic Psychology
Volume180
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2019

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social competence
Anger
anger
Mental Competency
Happiness
happiness
teacher rating
Preschool Children
preschool child
Hispanic Americans
African Americans
Fear
ethnicity
Interviews
anxiety
interaction
interview
Social Skills

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Cite this

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title = "Frequency and Intensity of Emotional Expressiveness and Preschool Children’s Peer Competence",
abstract = "Children’s emotional expressiveness with peers was examined as a predictor of social competence. Data were collected from 122 preschool children (57 boys, 65 girls; 86 European American, 9 African American, 17 Hispanic, and 10 other ethnicity) over a period of two years. Observations of children’s peer interactions in Year 1 were coded for frequency and intensity of happiness, anger, sadness, and fear. Sociometric interviews and teacher ratings provided assessments of children’s peer competence in both Years 1 and 2. Frequent expression of happiness in Year 1 predicted higher social competence scores in Year 2, whereas frequent anger in Year 1 predicted lower peer competence Year 2. More intense anger and sadness in Year 1 predicted lower peer social competence scores in Year 2. Frequency and intensity of emotional expressiveness in Year 1 accounted for unique variance in peer competence in Year 2.",
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Frequency and Intensity of Emotional Expressiveness and Preschool Children’s Peer Competence. / Lindsey, Eric.

In: Journal of Genetic Psychology, Vol. 180, No. 1, 02.01.2019, p. 45-61.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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