Frequency of energy drink use predicts illicit prescription stimulant use

Conrad L. Woolsey, Laura B. Barnes, Bert H. Jacobson, Weston S. Kensinger, Adam E. Barry, Niels C. Beck, Andrew G. Resnik, Marion W. Evans

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The purpose of this study was to examine energy drink (ED) usage patterns and to investigate the illicit use of prescription stimulants among college students. Methods: A sample of 267 undergraduate and graduate students (mean age of 22.48 among stimulant users) from a large midwestern university and its branch campus locations voluntarily participated in the study. Results: Among prescription stimulant users without a valid medical prescription, Mann-Whitney U tests and logistic regression analysis revealed that the frequency of ED use was a significant predictor of the illicit use of prescription stimulants. Moreover, frequency of ED consumption was a significant predictor of the illicit use of prescription stimulant medications, with the odds for using increasing by .06 with each additional day of ED use past 0 day (odds for use = 1.06, P =.008). Conclusions: Results indicate that the frequency of ED use is a significant predictor of the illicit use of prescription stimulants. All prescription stimulant users with or without a valid script also used EDs. This finding is important to practitioners because of the harmful interactions (eg, serotonin syndrome) that can occur when ED ingredients (eg, ginseng, yohimbine, evodamine, etc) are mixed with prescription stimulants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)96-103
Number of pages8
JournalSubstance Abuse
Volume35
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Energy Drinks
Prescriptions
Serotonin Syndrome
Students
Panax
Yohimbine
Nonparametric Statistics
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Woolsey, C. L., Barnes, L. B., Jacobson, B. H., Kensinger, W. S., Barry, A. E., Beck, N. C., ... Evans, M. W. (2014). Frequency of energy drink use predicts illicit prescription stimulant use. Substance Abuse, 35(1), 96-103. https://doi.org/10.1080/08897077.2013.810561
Woolsey, Conrad L. ; Barnes, Laura B. ; Jacobson, Bert H. ; Kensinger, Weston S. ; Barry, Adam E. ; Beck, Niels C. ; Resnik, Andrew G. ; Evans, Marion W. / Frequency of energy drink use predicts illicit prescription stimulant use. In: Substance Abuse. 2014 ; Vol. 35, No. 1. pp. 96-103.
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Woolsey, CL, Barnes, LB, Jacobson, BH, Kensinger, WS, Barry, AE, Beck, NC, Resnik, AG & Evans, MW 2014, 'Frequency of energy drink use predicts illicit prescription stimulant use', Substance Abuse, vol. 35, no. 1, pp. 96-103. https://doi.org/10.1080/08897077.2013.810561

Frequency of energy drink use predicts illicit prescription stimulant use. / Woolsey, Conrad L.; Barnes, Laura B.; Jacobson, Bert H.; Kensinger, Weston S.; Barry, Adam E.; Beck, Niels C.; Resnik, Andrew G.; Evans, Marion W.

In: Substance Abuse, Vol. 35, No. 1, 01.01.2014, p. 96-103.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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