Frequency with which surgeons undertake pancreaticoduodenectomy continues to determine length of stay, hospital charges, and in-hospital mortality

Alexander Rosemurgy, Sarah Cowgill, Brian Coe, Ashley Thomas, Sam Al-Saadi, Steven Goldin, Emmanuel Zervos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study was undertaken to determine changes in the frequency of, volume of, and outcomes after pancreaticoduodenectomy 6 years after a study denoted that, in Florida, the frequency and volume of pancreaticoduodenectomy impacted outcome. Using the State of Florida Agency for Health Care Administration database, the frequency and volume of pancreaticoduodenectomy was correlated with average length of hospital stay (ALOS), in-hospital mortality, and hospital charges for identical periods in 1995-1997 and 2003-2005. Compared to 1995-1997, 88% more pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed in 2003-2005 by 6% fewer surgeons; the majority of pancreaticoduodenectomies were conducted by surgeons doing <1 pancreaticoduodenectomy every 2 months. In-hospital mortality rate did not decrease from 1995-1997 to 2003-2005 (5.1 to 5.9%); in-hospital mortality rate increased for surgeons undertaking <1 pancreaticoduodenectomy every 2 months (5.5 to 12.3%, p∈<∈0.01). For 2003-2005, frequency with which pancreaticoduodenectomy is conducted inversely correlates with ALOS (p∈=∈0.001), hospital charges (p∈=∈0.001), and in-hospital mortality (p∈=∈0.001). In Florida, more pancreaticoduodenectomies are carried out by fewer surgeons. Mortality has not decreased because of surgeons infrequently performing pancreaticoduodenectomy. Most pancreaticoduodenectomies are still undertaken by surgeons who conduct pancreaticoduodenectomy infrequently with greater lengths of stay, hospital costs, and in-hospital mortality rates. To an even greater extent than previously documented, patients are best served by surgeons frequently performing pancreaticoduodenectomy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)442-449
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Gastrointestinal Surgery
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2008

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Hospital Charges
Pancreaticoduodenectomy
Hospital Mortality
Length of Stay
Mortality
Surgeons
Hospital Costs

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Rosemurgy, Alexander ; Cowgill, Sarah ; Coe, Brian ; Thomas, Ashley ; Al-Saadi, Sam ; Goldin, Steven ; Zervos, Emmanuel. / Frequency with which surgeons undertake pancreaticoduodenectomy continues to determine length of stay, hospital charges, and in-hospital mortality. In: Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery. 2008 ; Vol. 12, No. 3. pp. 442-449.
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abstract = "This study was undertaken to determine changes in the frequency of, volume of, and outcomes after pancreaticoduodenectomy 6 years after a study denoted that, in Florida, the frequency and volume of pancreaticoduodenectomy impacted outcome. Using the State of Florida Agency for Health Care Administration database, the frequency and volume of pancreaticoduodenectomy was correlated with average length of hospital stay (ALOS), in-hospital mortality, and hospital charges for identical periods in 1995-1997 and 2003-2005. Compared to 1995-1997, 88{\%} more pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed in 2003-2005 by 6{\%} fewer surgeons; the majority of pancreaticoduodenectomies were conducted by surgeons doing <1 pancreaticoduodenectomy every 2 months. In-hospital mortality rate did not decrease from 1995-1997 to 2003-2005 (5.1 to 5.9{\%}); in-hospital mortality rate increased for surgeons undertaking <1 pancreaticoduodenectomy every 2 months (5.5 to 12.3{\%}, p∈<∈0.01). For 2003-2005, frequency with which pancreaticoduodenectomy is conducted inversely correlates with ALOS (p∈=∈0.001), hospital charges (p∈=∈0.001), and in-hospital mortality (p∈=∈0.001). In Florida, more pancreaticoduodenectomies are carried out by fewer surgeons. Mortality has not decreased because of surgeons infrequently performing pancreaticoduodenectomy. Most pancreaticoduodenectomies are still undertaken by surgeons who conduct pancreaticoduodenectomy infrequently with greater lengths of stay, hospital costs, and in-hospital mortality rates. To an even greater extent than previously documented, patients are best served by surgeons frequently performing pancreaticoduodenectomy.",
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Frequency with which surgeons undertake pancreaticoduodenectomy continues to determine length of stay, hospital charges, and in-hospital mortality. / Rosemurgy, Alexander; Cowgill, Sarah; Coe, Brian; Thomas, Ashley; Al-Saadi, Sam; Goldin, Steven; Zervos, Emmanuel.

In: Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Vol. 12, No. 3, 01.03.2008, p. 442-449.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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