From Morbidity and Mortality to Quality Improvement: Effects of a Structured and Interactive Otolaryngology Conference

Daniel B. Spielman, Wayne D. Hsueh, Karen Y. Choi, John P. Bent

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Measure the effects of a structured morbidity and mortality conference format on the attitudes of resident and faculty participants. Study Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting: Otorhinolaryngology–head and neck surgery residency training program. Subjects and Methods: Two changes were implemented to the structure of our morbidity and mortality conference: (1) we adopted a recently described presentation framework called situation-background-assessment-recommendation and (2) appointed a faculty moderator to lead the conference. Surveys were distributed to residents and faculty before and after these modifications were implemented to measure changes in attitude of conference attendees. Results: After implementing the above changes to the morbidity and mortality conference, participant engagement increased from “moderately engaged” to “extremely engaged” (P <.01). Among both faculty and residents, the perceived educational value of conference also improved from “moderately educational” to “extremely educational” (P <.01). Finally in the attending cohort, the impact on future patient care increased from “no change” to “greatly enhanced” (P <.01). Conclusion: By implementing the situation-background-assessment-recommendation framework and appointing a faculty moderator to morbidity and mortality conference, participants reported significantly enhanced engagement during the conference, increased educational value of the session, and a positive impact on future patient care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalOTO Open
Volume1
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Surgery

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