De la violence du multiculturel à la transgression littéraire

Lectures ethnographiques de la littérature mauricienne contemporaine

Translated title of the contribution: From multicultural violence to literary transgression: Ethnographic readings of contemporary Mauritian literature

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The independent and contemporary island of Mauritius is often represented as a symbol of socio-ethnic harmony and brotherhood. However, the realities of the socio-cultural landscape do not always correspond to this idealized representation. The very idea of the Mauritian nation is generally articulated around a segmented model of multiculturalism and a definition of otherness that often results in some form of violence. Making reference to the creative works of Marie-Thérèse Humbert, Carl de Souza, Ananda Devi, and Amal Sewtohul, published between 1979 and 2012, this article demonstrates how postcolonial Mauritian literature challenges representations of exclusive ethnic identities and compartmentalized models of diversity, by articulating the transgression and deviance of inter- And transcultural situations in creolized contexts.

Original languageFrench
Pages (from-to)7-34
Number of pages28
JournalLettres Romanes
Volume68
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 25 2014

Fingerprint

Transgression
Ethnographic
Creative Work
Multiculturalism
Transcultural
Otherness
Mauritius
Ethnic Identity
Brotherhood
Cultural Landscape
Harmony
Symbol
Deviance

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Literature and Literary Theory

Cite this

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abstract = "The independent and contemporary island of Mauritius is often represented as a symbol of socio-ethnic harmony and brotherhood. However, the realities of the socio-cultural landscape do not always correspond to this idealized representation. The very idea of the Mauritian nation is generally articulated around a segmented model of multiculturalism and a definition of otherness that often results in some form of violence. Making reference to the creative works of Marie-Th{\'e}r{\`e}se Humbert, Carl de Souza, Ananda Devi, and Amal Sewtohul, published between 1979 and 2012, this article demonstrates how postcolonial Mauritian literature challenges representations of exclusive ethnic identities and compartmentalized models of diversity, by articulating the transgression and deviance of inter- And transcultural situations in creolized contexts.",
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