From the archives of the AFIP: Pediatric orbit tumors and tumorlike lesions: Neuroepithelial lesions of the ocular globe and optic nerve

Ellen M. Chung, Charles Specht, Jason W. Schroeder

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Tumors and tumorlike lesions of the globe and optic nerve in children represent a different histologic spectrum than in adults; the imaging appearances of these lesions reflect their pathologic features. Retinoblastoma is a tumor of infancy and the most common intraocular tumor in children. There are heritable and nonheritable forms. The most common clinical finding is leukocoria. The differential diagnoses of this sign include several nonneoplastic lesions: Persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous is a congenital persistence of an embryonic structure causing a retrolental mass. The primitive vasculature may produce a septum in the posterior chamber. Coats disease is a vascular malformation of the retina that produces a lipoproteinaceous subretinal exudate. The vascular malformation enhances with intravenous contrast material, and the fat-containing subretinal exudate does not. Larval endophthalmitis is a granulomatous reaction to the dead or dying larvae of Toxocara canis or T cati. The most important feature that allows differentiation of retinoblastoma from these so-called pseudoretinoblastomas is the presence of calcification in the former. Medulloepithelioma has two histologic forms; the teratoid type may contain calcifications, but it usually arises anteriorly from the ciliary body rather than posteriorly from the retina. Optic nerve glioma is the most common tumor of the optic nerve in children and is frequently associated with neurofibromatosis type 1. These gliomas are usually pilocytic astrocytomas and cause fusiform enlargement of the nerve.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1159-1186
Number of pages28
JournalRadiographics
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2007

Fingerprint

Orbit
Optic Nerve
Pediatrics
Vascular Malformations
Retinoblastoma
Exudates and Transudates
Retina
Neoplasms
Persistent Hyperplastic Primary Vitreous
Retinal Telangiectasis
Optic Nerve Glioma
Toxocara canis
Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumors
Ciliary Body
Neurofibromatosis 1
Endophthalmitis
Astrocytoma
Glioma
Contrast Media
Larva

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

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abstract = "Tumors and tumorlike lesions of the globe and optic nerve in children represent a different histologic spectrum than in adults; the imaging appearances of these lesions reflect their pathologic features. Retinoblastoma is a tumor of infancy and the most common intraocular tumor in children. There are heritable and nonheritable forms. The most common clinical finding is leukocoria. The differential diagnoses of this sign include several nonneoplastic lesions: Persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous is a congenital persistence of an embryonic structure causing a retrolental mass. The primitive vasculature may produce a septum in the posterior chamber. Coats disease is a vascular malformation of the retina that produces a lipoproteinaceous subretinal exudate. The vascular malformation enhances with intravenous contrast material, and the fat-containing subretinal exudate does not. Larval endophthalmitis is a granulomatous reaction to the dead or dying larvae of Toxocara canis or T cati. The most important feature that allows differentiation of retinoblastoma from these so-called pseudoretinoblastomas is the presence of calcification in the former. Medulloepithelioma has two histologic forms; the teratoid type may contain calcifications, but it usually arises anteriorly from the ciliary body rather than posteriorly from the retina. Optic nerve glioma is the most common tumor of the optic nerve in children and is frequently associated with neurofibromatosis type 1. These gliomas are usually pilocytic astrocytomas and cause fusiform enlargement of the nerve.",
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From the archives of the AFIP : Pediatric orbit tumors and tumorlike lesions: Neuroepithelial lesions of the ocular globe and optic nerve. / Chung, Ellen M.; Specht, Charles; Schroeder, Jason W.

In: Radiographics, Vol. 27, No. 4, 01.07.2007, p. 1159-1186.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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