From the field: Efficacy of detecting Chronic Wasting Disease via sampling hunter-killed white-tailed deer

Duane R Diefenbach, Christopher S. Rosenberry, Robert C. Boyd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Surveillance programs for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in free-ranging cervids often use a standard of being able to detect 1% prevalence when determining minimum sample sizes. However, 1% prevalence may represent >10,000 infected animals in a population of 1 million, and most wildlife managers would prefer to detect the presence of CWD when far fewer infected animals exist. We wanted to detect the presence of CWD in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in Pennsylvania when the disease was present in only 1 of 21 wildlife management units (WMUs) statewide. We used computer simulation to estimate the probability of detecting CWD based on a sampling design to detect the presence of CWD at 0.1% and 1.0% prevalence (23-76 and 225-762 infected deer, respectively) using tissue samples collected from hunter-killed deer. The probability of detection at 0.1% prevalence was <30% with sample sizes of ≤6,000 deer, and the probability of detection at 1.0% prevalence was 46-72% with statewide sample sizes of 2,000-6,000 deer. We believe that testing of hunter-killed deer is an essential part of any surveillance program for CWD, but our results demonstrated the importance of a multifaceted surveillance approach for CWD detection rather than sole reliance on testing hunter-killed deer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)267-272
Number of pages6
JournalWildlife Society Bulletin
Volume32
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

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chronic wasting disease
deer
sampling
wildlife management
animal
computer simulation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nature and Landscape Conservation

Cite this

Diefenbach, Duane R ; Rosenberry, Christopher S. ; Boyd, Robert C. / From the field : Efficacy of detecting Chronic Wasting Disease via sampling hunter-killed white-tailed deer. In: Wildlife Society Bulletin. 2004 ; Vol. 32, No. 1. pp. 267-272.
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From the field : Efficacy of detecting Chronic Wasting Disease via sampling hunter-killed white-tailed deer. / Diefenbach, Duane R; Rosenberry, Christopher S.; Boyd, Robert C.

In: Wildlife Society Bulletin, Vol. 32, No. 1, 01.01.2004, p. 267-272.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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