Fundamental cognitive concepts of space (and time): Using cross-linguistic, crowdsourced data to cognitively calibrate modes of overlap

Alexander Klippel, Jan Oliver Wallgrün, Jinlong Yang, Jennifer S. Mason, Eun Kyeong Kim, David M. Mark

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article makes several contributions to research on fundamental spatial and temporal concepts: First, we set out to render the notion of fundamental concepts of space and time more precise. Second, we introduce an efficient approach for collecting behavioral data combining crowdsourcing technology, efficient experimental software tools, and an effective and comprehensive analysis methodology. Third, we present behavioral studies that allow for identifying and calibrating potential candidates of fundamental spatial concepts from a cognitive perspective. Fourth, one prominent topic in the area of spatio-temporal cognition is the influence of language on how humans conceptualize their dynamic spatial environments. We used the aforementioned framework to collect data not only from English speaking participants but also from native Chinese and Korean speakers. Our application domain are the modes of overlap proposed by Galton [13]. We are able to show that the originally proposed spatial relations of the region connection calculus and intersection models are capturing cognitively fundamental distinctions that humans make with respect to modes of overlap. While finer distinctions are formally possible, they should not be considered fundamental conceptualizations in either Chinese, Korean, or English. The results show that our framework allows for efficiently answering questions about fundamental concepts of space, time, and space-time essential for theories of spatial information.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationSpatial Information Theory - 11th International Conference, COSIT 2013, Proceedings
Pages377-396
Number of pages20
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 9 2013
Event11th International Conference on Spatial Information Theory, COSIT 2013 - Scarborough, United Kingdom
Duration: Sep 2 2013Sep 6 2013

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume8116 LNCS
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

Other

Other11th International Conference on Spatial Information Theory, COSIT 2013
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityScarborough
Period9/2/139/6/13

Fingerprint

Linguistics
Overlap
Spatial Relations
Question Answering
Spatial Information
Cognition
Software Tools
Calculus
Intersection
Space-time
Concepts
Methodology
Framework
Human
Model

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Theoretical Computer Science
  • Computer Science(all)

Cite this

Klippel, A., Wallgrün, J. O., Yang, J., Mason, J. S., Kim, E. K., & Mark, D. M. (2013). Fundamental cognitive concepts of space (and time): Using cross-linguistic, crowdsourced data to cognitively calibrate modes of overlap. In Spatial Information Theory - 11th International Conference, COSIT 2013, Proceedings (pp. 377-396). (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 8116 LNCS). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-01790-7-21
Klippel, Alexander ; Wallgrün, Jan Oliver ; Yang, Jinlong ; Mason, Jennifer S. ; Kim, Eun Kyeong ; Mark, David M. / Fundamental cognitive concepts of space (and time) : Using cross-linguistic, crowdsourced data to cognitively calibrate modes of overlap. Spatial Information Theory - 11th International Conference, COSIT 2013, Proceedings. 2013. pp. 377-396 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)).
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Klippel, A, Wallgrün, JO, Yang, J, Mason, JS, Kim, EK & Mark, DM 2013, Fundamental cognitive concepts of space (and time): Using cross-linguistic, crowdsourced data to cognitively calibrate modes of overlap. in Spatial Information Theory - 11th International Conference, COSIT 2013, Proceedings. Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), vol. 8116 LNCS, pp. 377-396, 11th International Conference on Spatial Information Theory, COSIT 2013, Scarborough, United Kingdom, 9/2/13. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-01790-7-21

Fundamental cognitive concepts of space (and time) : Using cross-linguistic, crowdsourced data to cognitively calibrate modes of overlap. / Klippel, Alexander; Wallgrün, Jan Oliver; Yang, Jinlong; Mason, Jennifer S.; Kim, Eun Kyeong; Mark, David M.

Spatial Information Theory - 11th International Conference, COSIT 2013, Proceedings. 2013. p. 377-396 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 8116 LNCS).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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N2 - This article makes several contributions to research on fundamental spatial and temporal concepts: First, we set out to render the notion of fundamental concepts of space and time more precise. Second, we introduce an efficient approach for collecting behavioral data combining crowdsourcing technology, efficient experimental software tools, and an effective and comprehensive analysis methodology. Third, we present behavioral studies that allow for identifying and calibrating potential candidates of fundamental spatial concepts from a cognitive perspective. Fourth, one prominent topic in the area of spatio-temporal cognition is the influence of language on how humans conceptualize their dynamic spatial environments. We used the aforementioned framework to collect data not only from English speaking participants but also from native Chinese and Korean speakers. Our application domain are the modes of overlap proposed by Galton [13]. We are able to show that the originally proposed spatial relations of the region connection calculus and intersection models are capturing cognitively fundamental distinctions that humans make with respect to modes of overlap. While finer distinctions are formally possible, they should not be considered fundamental conceptualizations in either Chinese, Korean, or English. The results show that our framework allows for efficiently answering questions about fundamental concepts of space, time, and space-time essential for theories of spatial information.

AB - This article makes several contributions to research on fundamental spatial and temporal concepts: First, we set out to render the notion of fundamental concepts of space and time more precise. Second, we introduce an efficient approach for collecting behavioral data combining crowdsourcing technology, efficient experimental software tools, and an effective and comprehensive analysis methodology. Third, we present behavioral studies that allow for identifying and calibrating potential candidates of fundamental spatial concepts from a cognitive perspective. Fourth, one prominent topic in the area of spatio-temporal cognition is the influence of language on how humans conceptualize their dynamic spatial environments. We used the aforementioned framework to collect data not only from English speaking participants but also from native Chinese and Korean speakers. Our application domain are the modes of overlap proposed by Galton [13]. We are able to show that the originally proposed spatial relations of the region connection calculus and intersection models are capturing cognitively fundamental distinctions that humans make with respect to modes of overlap. While finer distinctions are formally possible, they should not be considered fundamental conceptualizations in either Chinese, Korean, or English. The results show that our framework allows for efficiently answering questions about fundamental concepts of space, time, and space-time essential for theories of spatial information.

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T3 - Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)

SP - 377

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Klippel A, Wallgrün JO, Yang J, Mason JS, Kim EK, Mark DM. Fundamental cognitive concepts of space (and time): Using cross-linguistic, crowdsourced data to cognitively calibrate modes of overlap. In Spatial Information Theory - 11th International Conference, COSIT 2013, Proceedings. 2013. p. 377-396. (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-01790-7-21