Further Considerations of visual cognitive neuroscience in aided AAC: The potential role of motion perception systems in maximizing design display

Vinoth Jagaroo, Krista M. Wilkinson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Current augmentative and alternative communication technologies allow animation within visual symbol displays. Clinicians therefore have the option of incorporating motion-based effects into AAC displays. Yet there is no research in the field of AAC to guide this clinical decision-making, in terms of the number or types of animated symbols that would best suit specific communication needs. A great deal is known within the discipline of cognitive neuroscience about how humans perceive motion, however. In this paper we propose that the field of AAC might exploit these known principles of motion perception, and we identify some potential uses of different types of motion. The discussion is presented within the context of neuro-cognitive theory concerning the neurological bases for motion perception.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)29-42
Number of pages14
JournalAAC: Augmentative and Alternative Communication
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2008

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Motion Perception
Communication
Technology
Research
Cognitive Neuroscience

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Rehabilitation
  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

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