Further studies on carry-over effects of dietary crude protein and triiodothyronine (T3) in broiler chickens

R. W. Rosebrough, J. P. McMurtry, R. Vasilatos-Younken

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Indian River male broiler chickens growing from 7 to 28 d of age were fed on diets containing either 120 or 210 g crude protein and 0 or 1 mg triiodothyronine (T3)/kg diet to study in vitro lipogenesis (IVL). In addition, a carry-over period (180 g crude protein/kg diet from 28 to 40 d of age) was used to test the persistence of prior treatment effects. The higher protein level increased, but T3 decreased (P < 0.01) growth and feed consumption at 28 d of age. The lower protein level increased (P < 0.05) and T3 decreased IVL in 28-d-old chickens. These effects were only sustained for 6 d following the switch to a common diet at 28 d. IVL at 40 d of age was not affected by either crude protein or T3 fed during the 7-28 d period. The higher protein level increased plasma insulin-like growth factor-1 during the period from 7 to 28 d; however, this effect lasted for only 6 d following the switch to a common diet. Plasma growth hormone (GH) at 28 d of age was inversely related to dietary protein level. Changing to a common level of crude protein did not change plasma GH values at 12 d, indicating that the nutritional state of the young chicken may affect GH at a later period of life. Metabolic changes noted in this study were rapid and maintained for a short period of time following the feeding of a common diet.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)89-95
Number of pages7
JournalBritish Journal of Nutrition
Volume79
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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