G proteins go green: A plant G protein signaling FAQ sheet

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

60 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Plants, like animals, use signal transduction pathways based on heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (C proteins) to regulate many aspects of development and cell signaling. Some components of G protein signaling are highly conserved between plants and animals and some are not This Viewpoint compares key aspects of G protein signal transduction in plants and animals and describes the current knowledge of this system in plants, the questions that still await exploration, and the value of research on plant C proteins to scientists who do not study plants. Pathways in Science's Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment Connections Maps database provide details about the emerging roles of C proteins in several cellular processes of plants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)71-73
Number of pages3
JournalScience
Volume310
Issue number5745
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 7 2005

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Gi-Go GTP-Binding Protein alpha Subunits
Viridiplantae
Plant Proteins
GTP-Binding Proteins
Signal Transduction
Protein C
Guanine Nucleotides
Carrier Proteins
Databases
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

Cite this

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abstract = "Plants, like animals, use signal transduction pathways based on heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (C proteins) to regulate many aspects of development and cell signaling. Some components of G protein signaling are highly conserved between plants and animals and some are not This Viewpoint compares key aspects of G protein signal transduction in plants and animals and describes the current knowledge of this system in plants, the questions that still await exploration, and the value of research on plant C proteins to scientists who do not study plants. Pathways in Science's Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment Connections Maps database provide details about the emerging roles of C proteins in several cellular processes of plants.",
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G proteins go green : A plant G protein signaling FAQ sheet. / Assmann, Sarah Mary.

In: Science, Vol. 310, No. 5745, 07.10.2005, p. 71-73.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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