Gasoline prices and their relationship to drunk-driving crashes

Guangqing Chi, Xuan Zhou, Timothy E. McClure, Paul A. Gilbert, Arthur G. Cosby, Li Zhang, Angela A. Robertson, David Levinson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigates the relationship between changing gasoline prices and drunk-driving crashes. Specifically, we examine the effects of gasoline prices on drunk-driving crashes in Mississippi by several crash types and demographic groups at the monthly level from 2004 to 2008, a period experiencing great fluctuation in gasoline prices. An exploratory visualization by graphs shows that higher gasoline prices are generally associated with fewer drunk-driving crashes. Higher gasoline prices depress drunk-driving crashes among young and adult drivers, among male and female drivers, and among white and black drivers. Results from negative binomial regression models show that when gas prices are higher, there are fewer drunk-driving crashes, particularly among property-damage-only crashes. When alcohol consumption levels are higher, there are more drunk-driving crashes, particularly fatal and injury crashes. The effects of gasoline prices and alcohol consumption are stronger on drunk-driving crashes than on all crashes. The findings do not vary much across different demographic groups. Overall, gasoline prices have greater effects on less severe crashes and alcohol consumption has greater effects on more severe crashes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)194-203
Number of pages10
JournalAccident Analysis and Prevention
Volume43
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

Fingerprint

Gasoline
alcohol consumption
Alcohol Drinking
Alcohols
driver
Demography
Mississippi
Driving Under the Influence
Statistical Models
fluctuation
visualization
Visualization
Young Adult
damages
Group
Gases
regression
Wounds and Injuries

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Law

Cite this

Chi, G., Zhou, X., McClure, T. E., Gilbert, P. A., Cosby, A. G., Zhang, L., ... Levinson, D. (2011). Gasoline prices and their relationship to drunk-driving crashes. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 43(1), 194-203. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aap.2010.08.009
Chi, Guangqing ; Zhou, Xuan ; McClure, Timothy E. ; Gilbert, Paul A. ; Cosby, Arthur G. ; Zhang, Li ; Robertson, Angela A. ; Levinson, David. / Gasoline prices and their relationship to drunk-driving crashes. In: Accident Analysis and Prevention. 2011 ; Vol. 43, No. 1. pp. 194-203.
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Chi, G, Zhou, X, McClure, TE, Gilbert, PA, Cosby, AG, Zhang, L, Robertson, AA & Levinson, D 2011, 'Gasoline prices and their relationship to drunk-driving crashes', Accident Analysis and Prevention, vol. 43, no. 1, pp. 194-203. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aap.2010.08.009

Gasoline prices and their relationship to drunk-driving crashes. / Chi, Guangqing; Zhou, Xuan; McClure, Timothy E.; Gilbert, Paul A.; Cosby, Arthur G.; Zhang, Li; Robertson, Angela A.; Levinson, David.

In: Accident Analysis and Prevention, Vol. 43, No. 1, 01.01.2011, p. 194-203.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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