Gastric emptying scintigraphy results may influence the selection of the type of bariatric surgery: A cohort study

Neeraj Khiyani, Mark Tulchinsky, Sana Hava, Truong An Ho, Simin Dadparvar, Majid Assadi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Bariatric surgery (BAS) may result in adverse outcomes that include appearance of gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms and/or failure to reach the weight reduction goal. This retrospective study tested the hypothesis that pre-operative gastric emptying (GE) abnormality is responsible for adverse post-surgical outcomes.Pre-operative GE was performed using the standard solid-meal GE scintigraphy (GES) in 111 consecutive patients (105 females and 6 males, mean age 46.2 years, range 20-70 years) who were evaluated for BAS. All underwent BAS - 93 had laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) and 18 had Roux-en-Y (ReY) gastric bypass. All had short-term (3-6 months) and long-term (up to 54 months) follow-up with review of symptoms, physical, and laboratory examinations. Chi-square analysis was performed. P-value <.05 was considered significant.Of the 111 patients, 83 had normal and 28 had abnormal pre-op GES. Sixty-eight were asymptomatic and 43 were symptomatic prior to surgery. Following surgery, 81 patients were asymptomatic and 30 were symptomatic at long-term follow-up. There was no significant difference between pre-op GE results and post-surgical adverse clinical outcome (p=ns). However, GES results seem to have guided the selection of surgical procedure significantly (P=.008).Pre-operative GE study was not a strong predictor of clinical outcome in BAS. Although, it influenced the type of surgery, as when the GES was abnormal, the patient was more likely to undergo ReY and when GES was normal, they favored LSG. Interestingly, many of our symptomatic patients at 6 months post-op were asymptomatic after long-term follow-up.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere17205
JournalMedicine (United States)
Volume98
Issue number41
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2019

Fingerprint

Bariatric Surgery
Gastric Emptying
Radionuclide Imaging
Cohort Studies
Gastrectomy
Gastric Bypass
Physical Examination
Meals
Weight Loss
Retrospective Studies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Khiyani, Neeraj ; Tulchinsky, Mark ; Hava, Sana ; Ho, Truong An ; Dadparvar, Simin ; Assadi, Majid. / Gastric emptying scintigraphy results may influence the selection of the type of bariatric surgery : A cohort study. In: Medicine (United States). 2019 ; Vol. 98, No. 41.
@article{373a307c8484427ab59d00f38d9d1738,
title = "Gastric emptying scintigraphy results may influence the selection of the type of bariatric surgery: A cohort study",
abstract = "Bariatric surgery (BAS) may result in adverse outcomes that include appearance of gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms and/or failure to reach the weight reduction goal. This retrospective study tested the hypothesis that pre-operative gastric emptying (GE) abnormality is responsible for adverse post-surgical outcomes.Pre-operative GE was performed using the standard solid-meal GE scintigraphy (GES) in 111 consecutive patients (105 females and 6 males, mean age 46.2 years, range 20-70 years) who were evaluated for BAS. All underwent BAS - 93 had laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) and 18 had Roux-en-Y (ReY) gastric bypass. All had short-term (3-6 months) and long-term (up to 54 months) follow-up with review of symptoms, physical, and laboratory examinations. Chi-square analysis was performed. P-value <.05 was considered significant.Of the 111 patients, 83 had normal and 28 had abnormal pre-op GES. Sixty-eight were asymptomatic and 43 were symptomatic prior to surgery. Following surgery, 81 patients were asymptomatic and 30 were symptomatic at long-term follow-up. There was no significant difference between pre-op GE results and post-surgical adverse clinical outcome (p=ns). However, GES results seem to have guided the selection of surgical procedure significantly (P=.008).Pre-operative GE study was not a strong predictor of clinical outcome in BAS. Although, it influenced the type of surgery, as when the GES was abnormal, the patient was more likely to undergo ReY and when GES was normal, they favored LSG. Interestingly, many of our symptomatic patients at 6 months post-op were asymptomatic after long-term follow-up.",
author = "Neeraj Khiyani and Mark Tulchinsky and Sana Hava and Ho, {Truong An} and Simin Dadparvar and Majid Assadi",
year = "2019",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/MD.0000000000017205",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "98",
journal = "Medicine; analytical reviews of general medicine, neurology, psychiatry, dermatology, and pediatries",
issn = "0025-7974",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "41",

}

Gastric emptying scintigraphy results may influence the selection of the type of bariatric surgery : A cohort study. / Khiyani, Neeraj; Tulchinsky, Mark; Hava, Sana; Ho, Truong An; Dadparvar, Simin; Assadi, Majid.

In: Medicine (United States), Vol. 98, No. 41, e17205, 01.10.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Gastric emptying scintigraphy results may influence the selection of the type of bariatric surgery

T2 - A cohort study

AU - Khiyani, Neeraj

AU - Tulchinsky, Mark

AU - Hava, Sana

AU - Ho, Truong An

AU - Dadparvar, Simin

AU - Assadi, Majid

PY - 2019/10/1

Y1 - 2019/10/1

N2 - Bariatric surgery (BAS) may result in adverse outcomes that include appearance of gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms and/or failure to reach the weight reduction goal. This retrospective study tested the hypothesis that pre-operative gastric emptying (GE) abnormality is responsible for adverse post-surgical outcomes.Pre-operative GE was performed using the standard solid-meal GE scintigraphy (GES) in 111 consecutive patients (105 females and 6 males, mean age 46.2 years, range 20-70 years) who were evaluated for BAS. All underwent BAS - 93 had laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) and 18 had Roux-en-Y (ReY) gastric bypass. All had short-term (3-6 months) and long-term (up to 54 months) follow-up with review of symptoms, physical, and laboratory examinations. Chi-square analysis was performed. P-value <.05 was considered significant.Of the 111 patients, 83 had normal and 28 had abnormal pre-op GES. Sixty-eight were asymptomatic and 43 were symptomatic prior to surgery. Following surgery, 81 patients were asymptomatic and 30 were symptomatic at long-term follow-up. There was no significant difference between pre-op GE results and post-surgical adverse clinical outcome (p=ns). However, GES results seem to have guided the selection of surgical procedure significantly (P=.008).Pre-operative GE study was not a strong predictor of clinical outcome in BAS. Although, it influenced the type of surgery, as when the GES was abnormal, the patient was more likely to undergo ReY and when GES was normal, they favored LSG. Interestingly, many of our symptomatic patients at 6 months post-op were asymptomatic after long-term follow-up.

AB - Bariatric surgery (BAS) may result in adverse outcomes that include appearance of gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms and/or failure to reach the weight reduction goal. This retrospective study tested the hypothesis that pre-operative gastric emptying (GE) abnormality is responsible for adverse post-surgical outcomes.Pre-operative GE was performed using the standard solid-meal GE scintigraphy (GES) in 111 consecutive patients (105 females and 6 males, mean age 46.2 years, range 20-70 years) who were evaluated for BAS. All underwent BAS - 93 had laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) and 18 had Roux-en-Y (ReY) gastric bypass. All had short-term (3-6 months) and long-term (up to 54 months) follow-up with review of symptoms, physical, and laboratory examinations. Chi-square analysis was performed. P-value <.05 was considered significant.Of the 111 patients, 83 had normal and 28 had abnormal pre-op GES. Sixty-eight were asymptomatic and 43 were symptomatic prior to surgery. Following surgery, 81 patients were asymptomatic and 30 were symptomatic at long-term follow-up. There was no significant difference between pre-op GE results and post-surgical adverse clinical outcome (p=ns). However, GES results seem to have guided the selection of surgical procedure significantly (P=.008).Pre-operative GE study was not a strong predictor of clinical outcome in BAS. Although, it influenced the type of surgery, as when the GES was abnormal, the patient was more likely to undergo ReY and when GES was normal, they favored LSG. Interestingly, many of our symptomatic patients at 6 months post-op were asymptomatic after long-term follow-up.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85072958832&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85072958832&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/MD.0000000000017205

DO - 10.1097/MD.0000000000017205

M3 - Article

C2 - 31593078

AN - SCOPUS:85072958832

VL - 98

JO - Medicine; analytical reviews of general medicine, neurology, psychiatry, dermatology, and pediatries

JF - Medicine; analytical reviews of general medicine, neurology, psychiatry, dermatology, and pediatries

SN - 0025-7974

IS - 41

M1 - e17205

ER -