Gender- and reticence-related vocal cues: An exploratory acoustical analysis

Deborah M. Rekart, Cynthia M. Finch, Mary Katherine Mino

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This essay describes three studies that compare acoustically vocal cues pertaining to both gender and type (reticence or nonreticence) in order to determine the interaction of gender and reticent/nonreticent vocal cues. The results of these exploratory studies suggest that individual vocal cues, such as fundamental frequency or pitch, fundamental frequency or pitch range, intensity or volume, and fluency or rate, may be associated primarily with gender, type (reticence or nonreticence) or gender and type. The studies’ findings have implications for those who are interested in gaining a clearer understanding of vocal cues for and across populations and in improving vocal delivery training.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-16
Number of pages16
JournalInternational Journal of Phytoremediation
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998

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gender
analysis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Pollution
  • Plant Science

Cite this

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Gender- and reticence-related vocal cues : An exploratory acoustical analysis. / Rekart, Deborah M.; Finch, Cynthia M.; Mino, Mary Katherine.

In: International Journal of Phytoremediation, Vol. 15, No. 1, 01.01.1998, p. 1-16.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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