Gender and Weight Concerns in Early and Middle Adolescence: Links with Well-Being and Family Characteristics

Susan M. McHale, Devon A. Corneal, Ann C. Crouter, Leann L. Birch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

27 Scopus citations

Abstract

Studied sex and developmental differences in weight concerns in early and middle adolescence and links between concerns and adolescent well-being and family experiences. Participants were mothers, fathers, and older and younger siblings (Ms = 15 and 12.5 years, respectively) from 197, Caucasian, working-middle class, 2-parent families. Parents rated their gender role attitudes and adolescents rated their weight concerns, well-being, gender role orientations, and physical development. Girls reported more concerns than boys; body mass index (BMI) correlated with weight concerns for all youth. Controlling for BMI and pubertal status, weight concerns were linked to older girls' well-being; with physical characteristics controlled, mothers' gender attitudes explained older girls' weight concerns, and siblings' weight concerns explained those of older and younger girls and boys.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)338-348
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology
Volume30
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

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