Gender development and sexuality in disorders of sex development

S. A. Berenbaum, H. F.L. Meyer-Bahlburg

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Understanding psychological development in individuals with disorders of sex development (DSD) is important for optimizing their clinical care and for identifying paths to competence and health in all individuals. In this paper, we focus on psychological outcomes likely to be influenced by processes of physical sexual differentiation that may be atypical in DSD, particularly characteristics related to being male or female (those that show sex differences in the general population, gender identity, and sexuality). We review evidence suggesting that (a) early androgens facilitate several aspects of male-typed behavior, with large effects on activity interests, and moderate effects on some social and personal behaviors (including sexual orientation) and spatial ability; (b) gender dysphoria and gender change occur more frequently in individuals with DSD than in the general population, with rates varying in relation to syndrome, initial gender assignment, and medical treatment; and (c) sexual behavior may be affected by DSD through several paths related to the condition and treatment, including reduced fertility, physical problems associated with genital ambiguity, social stigmatization, and hormonal variations. We also consider limitations to current work and challenges to studying gender and sexuality in DSD. We conclude with suggestions for a research agenda and a proposed research framework.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)361-366
Number of pages6
JournalHormone and Metabolic Research
Volume47
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2015

Fingerprint

Disorders of Sex Development
Sexuality
Androgens
Health
Sexual Behavior
Physical Phenomena
Psychology
Stereotyping
Sex Differentiation
Research
Sex Characteristics
Mental Competency
Population
Fertility
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Biochemistry, medical

Cite this

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Gender development and sexuality in disorders of sex development. / Berenbaum, S. A.; Meyer-Bahlburg, H. F.L.

In: Hormone and Metabolic Research, Vol. 47, No. 5, 01.05.2015, p. 361-366.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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