Gender differences in perceptions of household crowding: Stress, affiliation, and role obligations in rural India

Richard Barry Ruback, Janak Pandey

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Male and female researchers separately interviewed the male and female heads of household in each of 159 homes in three villages in northern India. Analyses revealed consistent gender differences, such that women, compared to men, rated their homes more negatively, experienced more physical symptoms, and thought the supply of resources was insufficient. Surprisingly, women also believed that their homes could house more people and were significantly more likely to want more children. In other words, women reacted negatively to crowding but also appeared to like having many people in the household. Possible reasons for this apparent contradiction are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)417-436
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Applied Social Psychology
Volume26
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 1996

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology

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