Gender differences in sexuality: A meta-analysis

Mary Beth Oliver, Janet Shibley Hyde

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

715 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This meta-analysis surveyed 177 usable sources that reported data on gender differences on 21 different measures of sexual attitudes and behaviors. The largest gender difference was in incidence of masturbation: Men had the greater incidence (d - .96). There was also a large gender difference in attitudes toward casual sex: Males had considerably more permissive attitudes (d .81). There were no gender differences in attitudes toward homosexuality or in sexual satisfaction. Most other gender differences were in the small-to-moderate range. Gender differences narrowed from the 1960s to the 1980s for many variables. Chodorow's neoanalytic theory, sociobiology, social learning theory, social role theory, and script theory are discussed in relation to these findings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)29-51
Number of pages23
JournalPsychological Bulletin
Volume114
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993

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Sexuality
Meta-Analysis
Sociobiology
Masturbation
Orgasm
Information Storage and Retrieval
Incidence
Homosexuality
Sexual Behavior

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Oliver, Mary Beth ; Hyde, Janet Shibley. / Gender differences in sexuality : A meta-analysis. In: Psychological Bulletin. 1993 ; Vol. 114, No. 1. pp. 29-51.
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Gender differences in sexuality : A meta-analysis. / Oliver, Mary Beth; Hyde, Janet Shibley.

In: Psychological Bulletin, Vol. 114, No. 1, 01.01.1993, p. 29-51.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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