Gender disparities among United States academic pediatric ophthalmologists: an analysis of publication productivity, academic rank, and NIH funding

Mona L. Camacci, Belinda Ikpoh, Erik B. Lehman, Esther Bowie, Ingrid U. Scott, Seth Pantanelli, Amanda Ely

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: To investigate gender disparitie among pediatric ophthalmologists in academic rank, publication productivity, and National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding. Methods: In this cross-sectional analysis of pediatric ophthalmologists at 113 US academic programs, data on gender, residency graduation year, and academic rank were obtained from institutional websites between January 2019 and March 2019. The Scopus database was used to calculate h-indices and m-quotients. The NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tool was used to determine NIH funding. Results: We identified 389 pediatric ophthalmologists: 194 women (49.9%) and 195 men (50.1%). A binomial logistic regression model, which included career length as an independent variable, showed proportions of women to men were similar across all academic ranks (assistant professor, 64.4% vs 46.2% [P = 0.738]; associate professor, 21.7% vs 19.0% [P = 0.357]; full professor, 13.9 vs 34.9% [P = 0.119]). Women had a lower median h-index (5.0 vs 8.0 [P = 0.008]) and a shorter median career duration (12.5 vs 25.0 years [P < 0.001]), but a similar median m-quotient (0.5 vs. 0.5; P = 0.525). Among pediatric ophthalmologists who received NIH funding (20 women vs. 27 men; P = 0.826), the overall median grant-funding total for women was $804K (interquartile range (IQR) 5.0M, mean $3.8M) compared to men, $2.2M (IQR, 4.0M; mean, $3.7M; P = 0.328). Conclusions: The shorter career duration for women likely contributes to the difference in overall h-indices between genders, as m-quotients were similar. The m-quotient should be used over the h-index when comparing academic productivity across genders when disparities in career length exist.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of AAPOS
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Ophthalmology

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