Gender, environmentalism, and interest in forest certification: Mohai’s paradox revisited

Lucie K. Ozanne, Craig R. Humphrey, Paul Michael Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This research corroborates work by Mohai (1992) and others showing a consistent gender difference in environmental concern favoring women. It also helps resolve a paradox that women show more environmental concern than men, but they are less environmentally active. Using data from a survey of U.S. homeowners completed in 1994, we again find women more environmentally concerned than men. However, when green consumerism, rather than membership in environmental organizations, is used as an indicator of environmentalism (the dependent variable), women tend to be more environmentally active than men.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)613-622
Number of pages10
JournalSociety and Natural Resources
Volume12
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999

Fingerprint

environmentalism
certification
gender
homeowner
research work
gender-specific factors
woman

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Development
  • Environmental Science (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Ozanne, Lucie K. ; Humphrey, Craig R. ; Smith, Paul Michael. / Gender, environmentalism, and interest in forest certification : Mohai’s paradox revisited. In: Society and Natural Resources. 1999 ; Vol. 12, No. 6. pp. 613-622.
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Gender, environmentalism, and interest in forest certification : Mohai’s paradox revisited. / Ozanne, Lucie K.; Humphrey, Craig R.; Smith, Paul Michael.

In: Society and Natural Resources, Vol. 12, No. 6, 01.01.1999, p. 613-622.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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