Gender, technology, and evolution: Cultural inheritance theory and prehistoric potters in Valencia, Spain

Sarah Barbara McClure

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this paper I explore the potential of cultural inheritance theory to address the specific social contexts of craft production in prehistoric societies. Proponents of agency theory have criticized the "techno- science" approach of scholars working with other theoretical paradigms and their unwillingness or inability to focus on human behavior instead of material remains. By emphasizing the social and contextual nature of technological practices, the critique has successfully highlighted the need to engender prehistoric technological practices. Cultural inheritance theory, one of several complementary currents in evolutionary archaeology, is particularly well suited to identify specific social contexts of craft production and provides a well-grounded framework for engendering prehistoric technological practices. Neolithic ceramic technology from Valencia, Spain provides a case study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)485-508
Number of pages24
JournalAmerican Antiquity
Volume72
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007

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Spain
gender
archaeology
paradigm
science
society
Cultural Evolution
Social Context
Craft Production
Agency Theory
Contextual
Human Behavior
Ceramic Technology
Technoscience
Evolutionary Archaeology
Paradigm

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • History
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Archaeology
  • Museology

Cite this

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Gender, technology, and evolution : Cultural inheritance theory and prehistoric potters in Valencia, Spain. / McClure, Sarah Barbara.

In: American Antiquity, Vol. 72, No. 3, 01.01.2007, p. 485-508.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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