Gendered discourse about climate change policies

Janet Kay Swim, Theresa K. Vescio, Julia L. Dahl, Stephanie J. Zawadzki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Extending theory and research on gender roles and masculinity, this work predicts and finds that common ways of talking about climate change are gendered. Climate change policy arguments that focus on science and business are attributed to men more than to women. By contrast, policy arguments that focus on ethics and environmental justice are attributed to women more than men (Study 1). Men show gender matching tendencies, being more likely to select (Study 2) and positively evaluate (Study 3) arguments related to science and business than ethics and environmental justice. Men also tend to attribute negative feminine traits to other men who use ethics and environmental justice arguments, which mediates the relation between type of argument and men's evaluation of the argument (Study 3). The gendered nature of public discourse about climate change and the need to represent ethical and environmental justice topics in this discourse are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)216-225
Number of pages10
JournalGlobal Environmental Change
Volume48
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

environmental justice
climate change
ethics
discourse
justice
gender role
moral philosophy
gender
business ethics
science
masculinity
policy
evaluation
woman

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Global and Planetary Change
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Ecology
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Cite this

Swim, Janet Kay ; Vescio, Theresa K. ; Dahl, Julia L. ; Zawadzki, Stephanie J. / Gendered discourse about climate change policies. In: Global Environmental Change. 2018 ; Vol. 48. pp. 216-225.
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Gendered discourse about climate change policies. / Swim, Janet Kay; Vescio, Theresa K.; Dahl, Julia L.; Zawadzki, Stephanie J.

In: Global Environmental Change, Vol. 48, 01.01.2018, p. 216-225.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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