General education teachers' experiences with inclusion of students who use augmentative and alternative communication

Jennifer E. Kent-Walsh, Janice C. Light

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

60 Scopus citations

Abstract

A qualitative interview methodology was used to investigate the experiences of 11 general education teachers who had included students with augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) in their classes. Information was gathered from participants in the following areas: (a) the benefits of including students who use AAC in general education classes, (b) the negative aspects of including these students, (c) the barriers to successful inclusion outcomes, (d) the supports required for successful inclusion, and (e) recommendations for other teachers and professionals (e.g., speech-language pathologists). Participants described barriers that they faced related to schools, teams, teachers, educational assistants, classmates, students, curricula, and AAC. Participants also emphasized the benefits of including students to the students themselves (e.g., increased classroom interactions with peers), classmates (e.g., increased acceptance of individuals with disabilities), and themselves as teachers (e.g., personal growth and learning). Results are discussed with reference to the literature as well as directions for future research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)104-124
Number of pages21
JournalAAC: Augmentative and Alternative Communication
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2003

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Rehabilitation
  • Speech and Hearing

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