General Internists as Change Agents: Opportunities and Barriers to Leadership in Health Systems and Medical Education Transformation

Jed D. Gonzalo, Cynthia H. Chuang, Susan A. Glod, Brian McGillen, Ryan Munyon, Daniel R. Wolpaw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Health systems are increasingly engaging in mission development around the quadruple aim of patient experience of care, population health, cost of care, and work-life balance of clinicians. This integrated approach is closely aligned with the education principles and competencies of health systems science (HSS), which includes population health, high-value care, leadership, teamwork, collaboration, and systems thinking. Influenced by health outcomes research, the systems-based practice competency, and the Clinical Learning Environment Review, many medical schools and residency programs are taking on the challenge of comprehensively incorporating these HSS competencies into the education agenda. General internal medicine physicians, inclusive of hospitalists, geriatricians, and palliative and primary care physicians, are at the frontlines of this transformation and uniquely positioned to contribute to and lead health system transformation, role model HSS competencies for trainees, and facilitate the education of a new workforce equipped with HSS skills to accelerate change in healthcare. Although GIM faculty are positioned to be early adopters and leaders in evolving systems of care and education, professional development and changes with academic health systems are required. This Perspective article explores the conceptualization and opportunities to effectively link GIM with healthcare and medical education transformation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1865-1869
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of general internal medicine
Volume35
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine

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