General self-efficacy and self-esteem: Toward theoretical and empirical distinction between correlated self-evaluations

Gilad Chen, Stanley Morris Gully, Dov Eden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

226 Scopus citations

Abstract

To test whether general self-efficacy and self-esteem relate differently to motivational and affective constructs, we collected data from samples in academic and work settings. Results suggest that general self-efficacy is more highly related to motivational variables than is self-esteem, whereas self-esteem is more highly related to affective variables than is general self-efficacy, as hypothesized. Furthermore, results support the notion that motivational and affective states differentially mediate the relationships of general self-efficacy and self-esteem with task performance. These results confirm the theoretical distinction between general self-efficacy and self-esteem and suggest that failure to distinguish between them might exact a price in terms of precision, validity, and understanding of determinants of performance. Implications for research and practice in organizations are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)375-395
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Organizational Behavior
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2004

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Psychology(all)
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

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