Genetic and environmental contributions to stability and change in levels of self-control

Kevin M. Beaver, Eric Joseph Connolly, Joseph A. Schwartz, Mohammed Said Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed Nezar Kobeisy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: There has been an emerging body of research estimating the stability in levels of self-control across different sections of the life course. At the same time, some of this research has attempted to examine the factors that account for both stability and change in levels of self-control. Missing from much of this research is a concerted focus on the genetic and environmental architecture of stability and change in self-control. Methods: The current study was designed to address this issue by analyzing a sample of kinship pairs drawn from the Child and Young Adult Supplement of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (CNLSY). Results: Analyses of these data revealed that genetic factors accounted for between 74 and 92 percent of the stability in self-control and between 78 and 89 percent of the change in self-control. Shared and nonshared environmental factors explained the rest of the stability and change in levels of self-control. Conclusions: A combination of genetic and environmental influences is responsible for the stability and change in levels of self-control over time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)300-308
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Criminal Justice
Volume41
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2013

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self-control
Research
Longitudinal Studies
Young Adult
heredity
kinship
supplement
young adult
environmental factors

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Applied Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Law

Cite this

Beaver, K. M., Connolly, E. J., Schwartz, J. A., Al-Ghamdi, M. S., & Kobeisy, A. N. (2013). Genetic and environmental contributions to stability and change in levels of self-control. Journal of Criminal Justice, 41(5), 300-308. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcrimjus.2013.07.003
Beaver, Kevin M. ; Connolly, Eric Joseph ; Schwartz, Joseph A. ; Al-Ghamdi, Mohammed Said ; Kobeisy, Ahmed Nezar. / Genetic and environmental contributions to stability and change in levels of self-control. In: Journal of Criminal Justice. 2013 ; Vol. 41, No. 5. pp. 300-308.
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Beaver, KM, Connolly, EJ, Schwartz, JA, Al-Ghamdi, MS & Kobeisy, AN 2013, 'Genetic and environmental contributions to stability and change in levels of self-control', Journal of Criminal Justice, vol. 41, no. 5, pp. 300-308. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcrimjus.2013.07.003

Genetic and environmental contributions to stability and change in levels of self-control. / Beaver, Kevin M.; Connolly, Eric Joseph; Schwartz, Joseph A.; Al-Ghamdi, Mohammed Said; Kobeisy, Ahmed Nezar.

In: Journal of Criminal Justice, Vol. 41, No. 5, 01.09.2013, p. 300-308.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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