Genetic and shared environmental contributions to the relationship between the Home environment and child and adolescent achievement

Hobart H. Cleveland, Kristen C. Jacobson, John J. Lipinski, David C. Rowe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present study used prospective data to examine the relationship between the family environment (as measured by the Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment-Short Form [HOME-SF]) and child and adolescent achievement, and to determine the genetic and environmental contributions to this relationship. Data are from 2108 full- and half-sibling pairs from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth Child data set (NLSY-Child). The average age of participants was 11.9 for older siblings (SD = 3.0) and 8.2 for younger siblings (SD = 2.8). The structural equation modeling program, Mx, was used to obtain the most precise estimates of genetic and environmental contributions to variation in the HOME-SF, variation in achievement, and to the covariation between the HOME-SF and achievement. According to the best-fitting, most parsimonious model, common genetic factors explained approximately one-quarter of the correlation between the HOME-SF and achievement, whereas common shared environmental factors explained the majority (75%) of this relationship. Genetic influences also accounted for over one-third of the variation in both the HOME-SF and achievement. Shared environmental influences explained 35% and 50% of the variation in achievement and the HOME-SF, respectively. The discussion mentions possible mechanisms by which genetic and environmental factors exert their influence on the relationship between the HOME-SF and achievement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)69-86
Number of pages18
JournalIntelligence
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

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