Genetic Influences Can Protect Against Unresponsive Parenting in the Prediction of Child Social Competence

Mark J. Van Ryzin, Leslie D. Leve, Jenae Marie Neiderhiser, Daniel S. Shaw, Misaki N. Natsuaki, David Reiss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although social competence in children has been linked to the quality of parenting, prior research has typically not accounted for genetic similarities between parents and children, or for interactions between environmental (i.e., parental) and genetic influences. In this article, the possibility of a Gene x Environment (G × E) interaction in the prediction of social competence in school-age children is evaluated. Using a longitudinal, multimethod data set from a sample of children adopted at birth (N = 361), a significant interaction was found between birth parent sociability and sensitive, responsive adoptive parenting when predicting child social competence at school entry (age 6), even when controlling for potential confounds. An analysis of the interaction revealed that genetic strengths can buffer the effects of unresponsive parenting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)667-680
Number of pages14
JournalChild development
Volume86
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2015

Fingerprint

social competence
Parenting
interaction
parents
adopted child
Parturition
sociability
Gene-Environment Interaction
school
Buffers
Parents
Social Skills
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Van Ryzin, Mark J. ; Leve, Leslie D. ; Neiderhiser, Jenae Marie ; Shaw, Daniel S. ; Natsuaki, Misaki N. ; Reiss, David. / Genetic Influences Can Protect Against Unresponsive Parenting in the Prediction of Child Social Competence. In: Child development. 2015 ; Vol. 86, No. 3. pp. 667-680.
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Genetic Influences Can Protect Against Unresponsive Parenting in the Prediction of Child Social Competence. / Van Ryzin, Mark J.; Leve, Leslie D.; Neiderhiser, Jenae Marie; Shaw, Daniel S.; Natsuaki, Misaki N.; Reiss, David.

In: Child development, Vol. 86, No. 3, 01.05.2015, p. 667-680.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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