Genetic, spatial, and temporal aspects of decline and mortality in a Fraxinus provenance test following invasion by the emerald ash borer

Kim C. Steiner, Lake E. Graboski, Kathleen S. Knight, Jennifer L. Koch, Mary E. Mason

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We report a 6-year study of an irruptive invasion of emerald ash borer (EAB) into a 36-year-old comparison of 60 green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh.) and 5 white ash (F. americana L.) populations. As the infestation progressed, annual measures of EAB injury (density of adult emergence holes on the trunk, crown condition, and mortality) were significantly influenced by genetic effects (population and in some instances family within population), site quality (field blocks), and neighborhood (contagion effects over distances of 5–13 m). At the last measurement, 99% of green ash trees and 87% of white ash were dead, and most of the remaining few trees had badly deteriorating crowns. Although final destruction was nearly complete, the rapidity with which trees were injured and killed was moderated by genetic and site effects and influenced by proximity to infested trees. These facts suggest that some genotypes, especially on favorable sites, will disproportionately survive under future equilibrium conditions with lower densities of ash and EAB in the landscape.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3439-3450
Number of pages12
JournalBiological Invasions
Volume21
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2019

Fingerprint

Agrilus planipennis
Fraxinus americana
Fraxinus pennsylvanica
emerald
Fraxinus
provenance
root crown
ash
mortality
testing
tree trunk
marshes
genotype
test
site effect
marsh

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology

Cite this

Steiner, Kim C. ; Graboski, Lake E. ; Knight, Kathleen S. ; Koch, Jennifer L. ; Mason, Mary E. / Genetic, spatial, and temporal aspects of decline and mortality in a Fraxinus provenance test following invasion by the emerald ash borer. In: Biological Invasions. 2019 ; Vol. 21, No. 11. pp. 3439-3450.
@article{ac30b749f27c4ca08dd171c236418bf3,
title = "Genetic, spatial, and temporal aspects of decline and mortality in a Fraxinus provenance test following invasion by the emerald ash borer",
abstract = "We report a 6-year study of an irruptive invasion of emerald ash borer (EAB) into a 36-year-old comparison of 60 green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh.) and 5 white ash (F. americana L.) populations. As the infestation progressed, annual measures of EAB injury (density of adult emergence holes on the trunk, crown condition, and mortality) were significantly influenced by genetic effects (population and in some instances family within population), site quality (field blocks), and neighborhood (contagion effects over distances of 5–13 m). At the last measurement, 99{\%} of green ash trees and 87{\%} of white ash were dead, and most of the remaining few trees had badly deteriorating crowns. Although final destruction was nearly complete, the rapidity with which trees were injured and killed was moderated by genetic and site effects and influenced by proximity to infested trees. These facts suggest that some genotypes, especially on favorable sites, will disproportionately survive under future equilibrium conditions with lower densities of ash and EAB in the landscape.",
author = "Steiner, {Kim C.} and Graboski, {Lake E.} and Knight, {Kathleen S.} and Koch, {Jennifer L.} and Mason, {Mary E.}",
year = "2019",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s10530-019-02059-w",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "21",
pages = "3439--3450",
journal = "Biological Invasions",
issn = "1387-3547",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",
number = "11",

}

Genetic, spatial, and temporal aspects of decline and mortality in a Fraxinus provenance test following invasion by the emerald ash borer. / Steiner, Kim C.; Graboski, Lake E.; Knight, Kathleen S.; Koch, Jennifer L.; Mason, Mary E.

In: Biological Invasions, Vol. 21, No. 11, 01.11.2019, p. 3439-3450.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Genetic, spatial, and temporal aspects of decline and mortality in a Fraxinus provenance test following invasion by the emerald ash borer

AU - Steiner, Kim C.

AU - Graboski, Lake E.

AU - Knight, Kathleen S.

AU - Koch, Jennifer L.

AU - Mason, Mary E.

PY - 2019/11/1

Y1 - 2019/11/1

N2 - We report a 6-year study of an irruptive invasion of emerald ash borer (EAB) into a 36-year-old comparison of 60 green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh.) and 5 white ash (F. americana L.) populations. As the infestation progressed, annual measures of EAB injury (density of adult emergence holes on the trunk, crown condition, and mortality) were significantly influenced by genetic effects (population and in some instances family within population), site quality (field blocks), and neighborhood (contagion effects over distances of 5–13 m). At the last measurement, 99% of green ash trees and 87% of white ash were dead, and most of the remaining few trees had badly deteriorating crowns. Although final destruction was nearly complete, the rapidity with which trees were injured and killed was moderated by genetic and site effects and influenced by proximity to infested trees. These facts suggest that some genotypes, especially on favorable sites, will disproportionately survive under future equilibrium conditions with lower densities of ash and EAB in the landscape.

AB - We report a 6-year study of an irruptive invasion of emerald ash borer (EAB) into a 36-year-old comparison of 60 green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh.) and 5 white ash (F. americana L.) populations. As the infestation progressed, annual measures of EAB injury (density of adult emergence holes on the trunk, crown condition, and mortality) were significantly influenced by genetic effects (population and in some instances family within population), site quality (field blocks), and neighborhood (contagion effects over distances of 5–13 m). At the last measurement, 99% of green ash trees and 87% of white ash were dead, and most of the remaining few trees had badly deteriorating crowns. Although final destruction was nearly complete, the rapidity with which trees were injured and killed was moderated by genetic and site effects and influenced by proximity to infested trees. These facts suggest that some genotypes, especially on favorable sites, will disproportionately survive under future equilibrium conditions with lower densities of ash and EAB in the landscape.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85069915123&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85069915123&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10530-019-02059-w

DO - 10.1007/s10530-019-02059-w

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85069915123

VL - 21

SP - 3439

EP - 3450

JO - Biological Invasions

JF - Biological Invasions

SN - 1387-3547

IS - 11

ER -