Geographic patterns of advanced breast cancer in Los Angeles: Associations with biological and sociodemographic factors (United States)

Marcia L. Gumpertz, Linda Williams Pickle, Barry A. Miller, B. Sue Bell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Examination of patterns of advanced breast cancer may provide evidence needed to direct health care resources to those communities or population groups in greatest need. We assessed to what degree biologic, ethnic, and sociodemographic factors could explain such patterns within Los Angeles County. Methods: The proportion of cases of advanced disease among all breast cancer cases identified during 1992-1996 were analyzed using generalized linear mixed models with random census tract effects. Models included characteristics of the individual and her tumor, census tract of residence, and aggregated health districts. Results: Approximately 6% of cases, ranging from 4% for Asian to 10% for Black women, were diagnosed as advanced, exhibiting striking geographic patterns. Tumor histology and hormone receptor status were most predictive of advanced disease. Sociodemographic variables such as marital status, median income, and distance to nearest mammography unit showed additional association with risk. Conclusions: These models explain most of the geographical patterns and eliminate differences between White and Hispanic but not Asian or Black women, identify subpopulations at high risk of advanced disease, and suggest cancer control opportunities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)325-339
Number of pages15
JournalCancer Causes and Control
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2006

Fingerprint

Los Angeles
Biological Factors
Censuses
Breast Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Health Resources
Marital Status
Mammography
Population Groups
Hispanic Americans
Linear Models
Histology
Hormones
Delivery of Health Care
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Gumpertz, Marcia L. ; Pickle, Linda Williams ; Miller, Barry A. ; Bell, B. Sue. / Geographic patterns of advanced breast cancer in Los Angeles : Associations with biological and sociodemographic factors (United States). In: Cancer Causes and Control. 2006 ; Vol. 17, No. 3. pp. 325-339.
@article{1f8106c5602244baba4af78d3ee10b37,
title = "Geographic patterns of advanced breast cancer in Los Angeles: Associations with biological and sociodemographic factors (United States)",
abstract = "Objective: Examination of patterns of advanced breast cancer may provide evidence needed to direct health care resources to those communities or population groups in greatest need. We assessed to what degree biologic, ethnic, and sociodemographic factors could explain such patterns within Los Angeles County. Methods: The proportion of cases of advanced disease among all breast cancer cases identified during 1992-1996 were analyzed using generalized linear mixed models with random census tract effects. Models included characteristics of the individual and her tumor, census tract of residence, and aggregated health districts. Results: Approximately 6{\%} of cases, ranging from 4{\%} for Asian to 10{\%} for Black women, were diagnosed as advanced, exhibiting striking geographic patterns. Tumor histology and hormone receptor status were most predictive of advanced disease. Sociodemographic variables such as marital status, median income, and distance to nearest mammography unit showed additional association with risk. Conclusions: These models explain most of the geographical patterns and eliminate differences between White and Hispanic but not Asian or Black women, identify subpopulations at high risk of advanced disease, and suggest cancer control opportunities.",
author = "Gumpertz, {Marcia L.} and Pickle, {Linda Williams} and Miller, {Barry A.} and Bell, {B. Sue}",
year = "2006",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s10552-005-0513-1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "17",
pages = "325--339",
journal = "Cancer Causes and Control",
issn = "0957-5243",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",
number = "3",

}

Geographic patterns of advanced breast cancer in Los Angeles : Associations with biological and sociodemographic factors (United States). / Gumpertz, Marcia L.; Pickle, Linda Williams; Miller, Barry A.; Bell, B. Sue.

In: Cancer Causes and Control, Vol. 17, No. 3, 01.04.2006, p. 325-339.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Geographic patterns of advanced breast cancer in Los Angeles

T2 - Associations with biological and sociodemographic factors (United States)

AU - Gumpertz, Marcia L.

AU - Pickle, Linda Williams

AU - Miller, Barry A.

AU - Bell, B. Sue

PY - 2006/4/1

Y1 - 2006/4/1

N2 - Objective: Examination of patterns of advanced breast cancer may provide evidence needed to direct health care resources to those communities or population groups in greatest need. We assessed to what degree biologic, ethnic, and sociodemographic factors could explain such patterns within Los Angeles County. Methods: The proportion of cases of advanced disease among all breast cancer cases identified during 1992-1996 were analyzed using generalized linear mixed models with random census tract effects. Models included characteristics of the individual and her tumor, census tract of residence, and aggregated health districts. Results: Approximately 6% of cases, ranging from 4% for Asian to 10% for Black women, were diagnosed as advanced, exhibiting striking geographic patterns. Tumor histology and hormone receptor status were most predictive of advanced disease. Sociodemographic variables such as marital status, median income, and distance to nearest mammography unit showed additional association with risk. Conclusions: These models explain most of the geographical patterns and eliminate differences between White and Hispanic but not Asian or Black women, identify subpopulations at high risk of advanced disease, and suggest cancer control opportunities.

AB - Objective: Examination of patterns of advanced breast cancer may provide evidence needed to direct health care resources to those communities or population groups in greatest need. We assessed to what degree biologic, ethnic, and sociodemographic factors could explain such patterns within Los Angeles County. Methods: The proportion of cases of advanced disease among all breast cancer cases identified during 1992-1996 were analyzed using generalized linear mixed models with random census tract effects. Models included characteristics of the individual and her tumor, census tract of residence, and aggregated health districts. Results: Approximately 6% of cases, ranging from 4% for Asian to 10% for Black women, were diagnosed as advanced, exhibiting striking geographic patterns. Tumor histology and hormone receptor status were most predictive of advanced disease. Sociodemographic variables such as marital status, median income, and distance to nearest mammography unit showed additional association with risk. Conclusions: These models explain most of the geographical patterns and eliminate differences between White and Hispanic but not Asian or Black women, identify subpopulations at high risk of advanced disease, and suggest cancer control opportunities.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=32944455091&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=32944455091&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10552-005-0513-1

DO - 10.1007/s10552-005-0513-1

M3 - Article

C2 - 16489540

AN - SCOPUS:32944455091

VL - 17

SP - 325

EP - 339

JO - Cancer Causes and Control

JF - Cancer Causes and Control

SN - 0957-5243

IS - 3

ER -