Geometry and chiral symmetry breaking of ripple junctions in 2D materials

Peng Zhao, Yuanxi Wang, Benjamin Katz, Eric Mockensturm, Vincent Henry Crespi, Sulin Zhang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In bulk crystals dislocation junctions underlie the physics of strain hardening. In two-dimensional (2D) crystals, dislocations take the form of surface ripples owing to the ease of bending and weak vdW adhesion of the atomic layers. Here we report that a ripple junction in 2D crystals features distinct morphologies and functions from their bulk counterparts. Our atomistic simulations show that a ripple junction in monolayer graphene exhibits four-fold symmetry. Upon biaxial compression the ripple junction undergoes helical instability, forming a helix with a random orientation. Differently, in-plane shear separates the junction into two individual ripples. We further demonstrate that the helicity of the junction can be controlled by a shear-compression loading sequence or the adsorption of a single chiral molecule at the junction. Shear-controlled helicity forms the basis for mechanical transduction and electro-opto-mechanical coupling, while adsorbate-driven helicity – which imparts the chirality of a single molecule onto a helical distortion pattern of the host 2D layer – has ramifications for sensing and chiral control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)337-343
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids
Volume131
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2019

Fingerprint

ripples
Dislocations (crystals)
broken symmetry
Molecules
Geometry
Chirality
Adsorbates
geometry
Strain hardening
Graphene
crystal dislocations
Monolayers
Compaction
Adhesion
Physics
Adsorption
Crystals
shear
strain hardening
chirality

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

@article{fac7521a237a4003914295f745914255,
title = "Geometry and chiral symmetry breaking of ripple junctions in 2D materials",
abstract = "In bulk crystals dislocation junctions underlie the physics of strain hardening. In two-dimensional (2D) crystals, dislocations take the form of surface ripples owing to the ease of bending and weak vdW adhesion of the atomic layers. Here we report that a ripple junction in 2D crystals features distinct morphologies and functions from their bulk counterparts. Our atomistic simulations show that a ripple junction in monolayer graphene exhibits four-fold symmetry. Upon biaxial compression the ripple junction undergoes helical instability, forming a helix with a random orientation. Differently, in-plane shear separates the junction into two individual ripples. We further demonstrate that the helicity of the junction can be controlled by a shear-compression loading sequence or the adsorption of a single chiral molecule at the junction. Shear-controlled helicity forms the basis for mechanical transduction and electro-opto-mechanical coupling, while adsorbate-driven helicity – which imparts the chirality of a single molecule onto a helical distortion pattern of the host 2D layer – has ramifications for sensing and chiral control.",
author = "Peng Zhao and Yuanxi Wang and Benjamin Katz and Eric Mockensturm and Crespi, {Vincent Henry} and Sulin Zhang",
year = "2019",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jmps.2019.07.007",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "131",
pages = "337--343",
journal = "Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids",
issn = "0022-5096",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",

}

Geometry and chiral symmetry breaking of ripple junctions in 2D materials. / Zhao, Peng; Wang, Yuanxi; Katz, Benjamin; Mockensturm, Eric; Crespi, Vincent Henry; Zhang, Sulin.

In: Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids, Vol. 131, 01.10.2019, p. 337-343.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Geometry and chiral symmetry breaking of ripple junctions in 2D materials

AU - Zhao, Peng

AU - Wang, Yuanxi

AU - Katz, Benjamin

AU - Mockensturm, Eric

AU - Crespi, Vincent Henry

AU - Zhang, Sulin

PY - 2019/10/1

Y1 - 2019/10/1

N2 - In bulk crystals dislocation junctions underlie the physics of strain hardening. In two-dimensional (2D) crystals, dislocations take the form of surface ripples owing to the ease of bending and weak vdW adhesion of the atomic layers. Here we report that a ripple junction in 2D crystals features distinct morphologies and functions from their bulk counterparts. Our atomistic simulations show that a ripple junction in monolayer graphene exhibits four-fold symmetry. Upon biaxial compression the ripple junction undergoes helical instability, forming a helix with a random orientation. Differently, in-plane shear separates the junction into two individual ripples. We further demonstrate that the helicity of the junction can be controlled by a shear-compression loading sequence or the adsorption of a single chiral molecule at the junction. Shear-controlled helicity forms the basis for mechanical transduction and electro-opto-mechanical coupling, while adsorbate-driven helicity – which imparts the chirality of a single molecule onto a helical distortion pattern of the host 2D layer – has ramifications for sensing and chiral control.

AB - In bulk crystals dislocation junctions underlie the physics of strain hardening. In two-dimensional (2D) crystals, dislocations take the form of surface ripples owing to the ease of bending and weak vdW adhesion of the atomic layers. Here we report that a ripple junction in 2D crystals features distinct morphologies and functions from their bulk counterparts. Our atomistic simulations show that a ripple junction in monolayer graphene exhibits four-fold symmetry. Upon biaxial compression the ripple junction undergoes helical instability, forming a helix with a random orientation. Differently, in-plane shear separates the junction into two individual ripples. We further demonstrate that the helicity of the junction can be controlled by a shear-compression loading sequence or the adsorption of a single chiral molecule at the junction. Shear-controlled helicity forms the basis for mechanical transduction and electro-opto-mechanical coupling, while adsorbate-driven helicity – which imparts the chirality of a single molecule onto a helical distortion pattern of the host 2D layer – has ramifications for sensing and chiral control.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85069567145&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85069567145&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jmps.2019.07.007

DO - 10.1016/j.jmps.2019.07.007

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85069567145

VL - 131

SP - 337

EP - 343

JO - Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids

JF - Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids

SN - 0022-5096

ER -