Giant anisotropic magnetoresistance in a quantum anomalous Hall insulator

Abhinav Kandala, Anthony Richardella, Susan Kempinger, Chao Xing Liu, Nitin Samarth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

When a three-dimensional ferromagnetic topological insulator thin film is magnetized out-of-plane, conduction ideally occurs through dissipationless, one-dimensional (1D) chiral states that are characterized by a quantized, zero-field Hall conductance. The recent realization of this phenomenon, the quantum anomalous Hall effect, provides a conceptually new platform for studies of 1D transport, distinct from the traditionally studied quantum Hall effects that arise from Landau level formation. An important question arises in this context: how do these 1D edge states evolve as the magnetization is changed from out-of-plane to in-plane? We examine this question by studying the field-tilt-driven crossover from predominantly edge-state transport to diffusive transport in Crx(Bi,Sb)2-x Te3 thin films. This crossover manifests itself in a giant, electrically tunable anisotropic magnetoresistance that we explain by employing a Landauer-Büttiker formalism. Our methodology provides a powerful means of quantifying dissipative effects in temperature and chemical potential regimes far from perfect quantization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number7434
JournalNature communications
Volume6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 7 2015

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Enhanced magnetoresistance
Quantum Hall effect
Giant magnetoresistance
crossovers
insulators
Thin films
Temperature
Chemical potential
quantum Hall effect
thin films
Hall effect
Magnetization
platforms
methodology
formalism
conduction
magnetization
temperature

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "When a three-dimensional ferromagnetic topological insulator thin film is magnetized out-of-plane, conduction ideally occurs through dissipationless, one-dimensional (1D) chiral states that are characterized by a quantized, zero-field Hall conductance. The recent realization of this phenomenon, the quantum anomalous Hall effect, provides a conceptually new platform for studies of 1D transport, distinct from the traditionally studied quantum Hall effects that arise from Landau level formation. An important question arises in this context: how do these 1D edge states evolve as the magnetization is changed from out-of-plane to in-plane? We examine this question by studying the field-tilt-driven crossover from predominantly edge-state transport to diffusive transport in Crx(Bi,Sb)2-x Te3 thin films. This crossover manifests itself in a giant, electrically tunable anisotropic magnetoresistance that we explain by employing a Landauer-B{\"u}ttiker formalism. Our methodology provides a powerful means of quantifying dissipative effects in temperature and chemical potential regimes far from perfect quantization.",
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Giant anisotropic magnetoresistance in a quantum anomalous Hall insulator. / Kandala, Abhinav; Richardella, Anthony; Kempinger, Susan; Liu, Chao Xing; Samarth, Nitin.

In: Nature communications, Vol. 6, 7434, 07.07.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Kandala, Abhinav

AU - Richardella, Anthony

AU - Kempinger, Susan

AU - Liu, Chao Xing

AU - Samarth, Nitin

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AB - When a three-dimensional ferromagnetic topological insulator thin film is magnetized out-of-plane, conduction ideally occurs through dissipationless, one-dimensional (1D) chiral states that are characterized by a quantized, zero-field Hall conductance. The recent realization of this phenomenon, the quantum anomalous Hall effect, provides a conceptually new platform for studies of 1D transport, distinct from the traditionally studied quantum Hall effects that arise from Landau level formation. An important question arises in this context: how do these 1D edge states evolve as the magnetization is changed from out-of-plane to in-plane? We examine this question by studying the field-tilt-driven crossover from predominantly edge-state transport to diffusive transport in Crx(Bi,Sb)2-x Te3 thin films. This crossover manifests itself in a giant, electrically tunable anisotropic magnetoresistance that we explain by employing a Landauer-Büttiker formalism. Our methodology provides a powerful means of quantifying dissipative effects in temperature and chemical potential regimes far from perfect quantization.

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