Glaciohydraulic supercooling: A freeze-on mechanism to create stratified, debris-rich basal ice: II. Theory

Richard B. Alley, Daniel E. Lawson, Edward B. Evenson, Jeffrey C. Strasser, Grahame J. Larson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

123 Scopus citations

Abstract

Simple theory supports field observations (Lawson and others, 1998) that subglacial water flow out of overdeepenings can cause accretion of layered, debris-bearing ice to the bases of glaciers. The large meltwater flux into a temperate glacier at the onset of summer melting can cause rapid water flow through expanded basal activities or other flow paths. If that flow ascends a sufficiently steep slope out of an overdeepening, the water will supercool as the pressure-melting point rises, and basal-ice accretion will occur. Diurnal, occasional or annual fluctuations in water discharge will cause variations in accretion rate, debris content of accreted ice or subsequent diagenesis, producing layers. Under appropriate conditions, net accretion of debris-bearing basal ice will allow debris fluxes that are significant in the glacier sediment budget.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)563-569
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Glaciology
Volume44
Issue number148
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Earth-Surface Processes

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Glaciohydraulic supercooling: A freeze-on mechanism to create stratified, debris-rich basal ice: II. Theory'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this