Good grief and not-so-good grief: Countertransference in bereavement therapy

Jeffrey Hayes, Yun Jy Yeh, Alanna Eisenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between therapists' grief related to the death of a loved one and clients' perceptions of the process of bereavement therapy. Mail survey data were obtained from 69 client-therapist dyads. Results indicated that the extent to which therapists missed deceased loved ones was inversely related to client perceptions of therapist empathy, but not to client ratings of the alliance, session depth, or therapist credibility. Therapist acceptance of the death of a loved one was unrelated to any of the dependent measures. Results are discussed in terms of countertransference and its management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)345-355
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Clinical Psychology
Volume63
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2007

Fingerprint

Bereavement
Grief
Postal Service
Therapeutics
Countertransference (Psychology)
Therapy
Countertransference
Surveys and Questionnaires
Empathy
Alliances
Acceptance
Dyads
Survey Data
Rating
Credibility

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Hayes, Jeffrey ; Yeh, Yun Jy ; Eisenberg, Alanna. / Good grief and not-so-good grief : Countertransference in bereavement therapy. In: Journal of Clinical Psychology. 2007 ; Vol. 63, No. 4. pp. 345-355.
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Good grief and not-so-good grief : Countertransference in bereavement therapy. / Hayes, Jeffrey; Yeh, Yun Jy; Eisenberg, Alanna.

In: Journal of Clinical Psychology, Vol. 63, No. 4, 01.04.2007, p. 345-355.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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