Governmental efforts on homeland security and crime

Public views and opinions

Everette B. Penn, George E. Higgins, Shaun L. Gabbidon, Kareem L. Jordan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper examines views of the respondents regarding homeland security and traditional crime in the United States. Using questions from the 2007 Penn State Poll, a sample of 862 Pennsylvanians participated through a telephone interview. Participants were questioned about their concerns regarding the effectiveness of homeland security, their fear of crime (white-collar, property, violent and terrorist attacks). The results revealed that citizens were satisfied with the effectiveness of homeland security since the September 11, 2001, attacks. The results indicate that fear of crime is different for demographics, and we were able to show that those that thought homeland security had been effective increased the likelihood of fear of white-collar crime. We were also able to show demographic differences for national spending on crime. In addition, we were able to show that those who believed that homeland security was effective did not believe that national spending was at the proper level for property, violent, or white-collar crime. The implications of these results are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)28-40
Number of pages13
JournalAmerican Journal of Criminal Justice
Volume34
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2009

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Homelands
offense
anxiety
September 11, 2001
telephone interview
citizen

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Law

Cite this

Penn, Everette B. ; Higgins, George E. ; Gabbidon, Shaun L. ; Jordan, Kareem L. / Governmental efforts on homeland security and crime : Public views and opinions. In: American Journal of Criminal Justice. 2009 ; Vol. 34, No. 1-2. pp. 28-40.
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Governmental efforts on homeland security and crime : Public views and opinions. / Penn, Everette B.; Higgins, George E.; Gabbidon, Shaun L.; Jordan, Kareem L.

In: American Journal of Criminal Justice, Vol. 34, No. 1-2, 01.06.2009, p. 28-40.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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