Grassroots resistance to sustainable development: lessons from the banks of the Narmada

G. Esteva, Madhu Suri Prakash

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Both those resisting and those defending the Narmada Valley Project use the language of social justice and sustainable development, and both lobbies have justified their stance with cost-benefit analyses and grassroots mobilization. The most effective opposition to the dams, however, has come from groups whose concern is not abstract rights and promises, but the survival of local cultures and the autonomy of communities. If grassroots groups can retain their localized, concrete concerns, while making alliances with other groups defending their own localities from destruction, these movements may gain the strength to resist the cultural damage of sustainable development. -Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)45-51
Number of pages7
JournalEcologist
Volume22
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992

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sustainable development
social justice
autonomy
mobilization
valleys
dam
valley
damage
cost-benefit
rights
project

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology

Cite this

Esteva, G. ; Prakash, Madhu Suri. / Grassroots resistance to sustainable development : lessons from the banks of the Narmada. In: Ecologist. 1992 ; Vol. 22, No. 2. pp. 45-51.
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Grassroots resistance to sustainable development : lessons from the banks of the Narmada. / Esteva, G.; Prakash, Madhu Suri.

In: Ecologist, Vol. 22, No. 2, 01.01.1992, p. 45-51.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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