Gravity waves-induced airglow temperature variations, phase relationships, and Krassovsky ratio for OH(8,3) airglow, O2(0,1) atmospheric band, and O(1S) greenline in the MLT region

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

The gravity wave-induced secular variations and fluctuations of airglow intensity-weighted temperatures for OH(8,3) nightglow, O2(0,1) atmospheric band, and O(1S) greenline in the MLT region were simulated to study the wave effects' on airglow temperatures. They were investigated with a time-dependent OH Chemistry-Dynamics (OHCD) model and a Multiple Airglow Chemistry-Dynamics (MACD) model with a small-scale linear gravity wave packet. The largest wave-induced airglow temperature secular variations are found to be ~0.8% in the O2(0,1) temperature and the largest wave-induced airglow temperature fluctuations are found to be ~0.25% in the O(1S) temperature. We also investigated the phase relationships between the airglow intensities and temperatures. Our results show that the airglow intensities lead the airglow temperatures most of the time. Also, airglow located at a higher altitude leads the airglow located at a lower altitude, indicating a downward phase progression, which is consistent with the phase of the wave packet we used. The Krassovsky ratio for these airglow emissions were calculated and found to be decreasing with increasing altitude. The amplitude of the Krassovsky ratio for OH(8,3) airglow, O2(0,1) atmospheric band, and O(1S) greenline were ~10, 6, and 4, respectively.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)68-74
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics
Volume130-131
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2015

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geophysics
  • Atmospheric Science
  • Space and Planetary Science

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Gravity waves-induced airglow temperature variations, phase relationships, and Krassovsky ratio for OH(8,3) airglow, O<sub>2</sub>(0,1) atmospheric band, and O(<sup>1</sup>S) greenline in the MLT region'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this