Great Lakes Copper and Shared Mortuary Practices on the Atlantic Coast: Implications for Long-Distance Exchange during the Late Archaic

Matthew C. Sanger, Brian D. Padgett, Clark Spencer Larsen, Mark Hill, Gregory D. Lattanzi, Carol E. Colaninno, Brendan J. Culleton, Douglas James Kennett, Matthew F. Napolitano, Sébastien Lacombe, Robert J. Speakman, David Hurst Thomas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Analysis of human remains and a copper band found in the center of a Late Archaic (ca. 5000-3000 cal BP) shell ring demonstrate an exchange network between the Great Lakes and the coastal southeast United States. Similarities in mortuary practices suggest that the movement of objects between these two regions was more direct and unmediated than archaeologists previously assumed based on down-the-line models of exchange. These findings challenge prevalent notions that view preagricultural Native American communities as relatively isolated from one another and suggest instead that wide social networks spanned much of North America thousands of years before the advent of domestication.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)591-609
Number of pages19
JournalAmerican Antiquity
Volume84
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2019

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • History
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Archaeology
  • Museology

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