Greater Exercise Pressor Response Is Associated With Impaired Claudication Outcomes in Symptomatic Peripheral Artery Disease

Andrew W. Gardner, Polly S. Montgomery, Ming Wang, Chixiang Chen, Marcos Kuroki, Danielle Jin Kwang Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

We determined whether a greater exercise pressor response during a constant-load treadmill test was associated with lower peak walking time (PWT) and claudication onset time (COT) measured during a graded maximal treadmill test in 304 patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease (PAD). The exercise pressor response was assessed by measuring heart rate and blood pressure (BP) at rest and during a constant-load treadmill test (speed = 2 mph, grade = 0%). After only 2 minutes of walking, mean heart rate increased by 26 beats/min from rest and mean systolic BP increased by 16 mm Hg. In adjusted analyses, increases in systolic BP (P =.021), heart rate (P =.002), mean arterial pressure (P =.034), and rate–pressure product (P <.001) from rest to 2 minutes of constant-load exercise were negatively associated with COT. Similarly, increases in heart rate (P =.012) and rate–pressure product (P =.018) from rest to 2 minutes of constant-load exercise were negatively associated with PWT. A greater exercise pressor response observed after only 2 minutes of walking at no incline was independently associated with impaired claudication outcomes in patients with symptomatic PAD. The implication is that the exercise pressor response is an important and easily obtained clinical measurement that partially explains differences in PWT and COT.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)220-228
Number of pages9
JournalAngiology
Volume70
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2019

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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