Group structure and entitativity in group fitness

considering groupness at within- and between-group levels

Michael Blair Evans, Scott Graupensperger, Alex J. Benson, Mark Eys, Bryce Hastings, Jinger Gottschall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: How can we distinguish between a collection of individuals exercising alongside one another from group that is exercising ‘together’? This question is central to research on the extent that individuals perceive their fitness settings to entail core features of groups. To advance understanding of the nature of groupness and its implications in exercise, the current study (a) evaluated a brief measure of groupness and (b) examined the extent that groupness predicted perceptions of exertion and affect. Design: Participants included 633 exercisers (M age = 33.92, SD = 11.05, 74% female) who completed surveys after group fitness classes (k = 34). Main outcome measures: Groupness, affect, exertion, and group cohesion. Results: Exploratory structural equation modelling provided support for a two-factor solution reflecting entitativity and group structure as subdimensions of groupness. The groupness factors were differentially associated with theoretically relevant aspects of classes (e.g. synchronised movement), the individual (e.g. number of members interacted with), as well as group cohesion. Groupness also predicted perceived exertion and affect. Conclusion: Our research provides support for a brief measure of groupness, advances theory related to how individuals perceive exercise groups, and provides evidence regarding how broader experiences during exercise may relate to exercisers’ perceptions of groupness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)715-732
Number of pages18
JournalPsychology and Health
Volume34
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 3 2019

Fingerprint

Research
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Evans, Michael Blair ; Graupensperger, Scott ; Benson, Alex J. ; Eys, Mark ; Hastings, Bryce ; Gottschall, Jinger. / Group structure and entitativity in group fitness : considering groupness at within- and between-group levels. In: Psychology and Health. 2019 ; Vol. 34, No. 6. pp. 715-732.
@article{71508b35688f4617a0fc95cc164c0077,
title = "Group structure and entitativity in group fitness: considering groupness at within- and between-group levels",
abstract = "Objective: How can we distinguish between a collection of individuals exercising alongside one another from group that is exercising ‘together’? This question is central to research on the extent that individuals perceive their fitness settings to entail core features of groups. To advance understanding of the nature of groupness and its implications in exercise, the current study (a) evaluated a brief measure of groupness and (b) examined the extent that groupness predicted perceptions of exertion and affect. Design: Participants included 633 exercisers (M age = 33.92, SD = 11.05, 74{\%} female) who completed surveys after group fitness classes (k = 34). Main outcome measures: Groupness, affect, exertion, and group cohesion. Results: Exploratory structural equation modelling provided support for a two-factor solution reflecting entitativity and group structure as subdimensions of groupness. The groupness factors were differentially associated with theoretically relevant aspects of classes (e.g. synchronised movement), the individual (e.g. number of members interacted with), as well as group cohesion. Groupness also predicted perceived exertion and affect. Conclusion: Our research provides support for a brief measure of groupness, advances theory related to how individuals perceive exercise groups, and provides evidence regarding how broader experiences during exercise may relate to exercisers’ perceptions of groupness.",
author = "Evans, {Michael Blair} and Scott Graupensperger and Benson, {Alex J.} and Mark Eys and Bryce Hastings and Jinger Gottschall",
year = "2019",
month = "6",
day = "3",
doi = "10.1080/08870446.2019.1566548",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "34",
pages = "715--732",
journal = "Psychology and Health",
issn = "0887-0446",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "6",

}

Group structure and entitativity in group fitness : considering groupness at within- and between-group levels. / Evans, Michael Blair; Graupensperger, Scott; Benson, Alex J.; Eys, Mark; Hastings, Bryce; Gottschall, Jinger.

In: Psychology and Health, Vol. 34, No. 6, 03.06.2019, p. 715-732.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Group structure and entitativity in group fitness

T2 - considering groupness at within- and between-group levels

AU - Evans, Michael Blair

AU - Graupensperger, Scott

AU - Benson, Alex J.

AU - Eys, Mark

AU - Hastings, Bryce

AU - Gottschall, Jinger

PY - 2019/6/3

Y1 - 2019/6/3

N2 - Objective: How can we distinguish between a collection of individuals exercising alongside one another from group that is exercising ‘together’? This question is central to research on the extent that individuals perceive their fitness settings to entail core features of groups. To advance understanding of the nature of groupness and its implications in exercise, the current study (a) evaluated a brief measure of groupness and (b) examined the extent that groupness predicted perceptions of exertion and affect. Design: Participants included 633 exercisers (M age = 33.92, SD = 11.05, 74% female) who completed surveys after group fitness classes (k = 34). Main outcome measures: Groupness, affect, exertion, and group cohesion. Results: Exploratory structural equation modelling provided support for a two-factor solution reflecting entitativity and group structure as subdimensions of groupness. The groupness factors were differentially associated with theoretically relevant aspects of classes (e.g. synchronised movement), the individual (e.g. number of members interacted with), as well as group cohesion. Groupness also predicted perceived exertion and affect. Conclusion: Our research provides support for a brief measure of groupness, advances theory related to how individuals perceive exercise groups, and provides evidence regarding how broader experiences during exercise may relate to exercisers’ perceptions of groupness.

AB - Objective: How can we distinguish between a collection of individuals exercising alongside one another from group that is exercising ‘together’? This question is central to research on the extent that individuals perceive their fitness settings to entail core features of groups. To advance understanding of the nature of groupness and its implications in exercise, the current study (a) evaluated a brief measure of groupness and (b) examined the extent that groupness predicted perceptions of exertion and affect. Design: Participants included 633 exercisers (M age = 33.92, SD = 11.05, 74% female) who completed surveys after group fitness classes (k = 34). Main outcome measures: Groupness, affect, exertion, and group cohesion. Results: Exploratory structural equation modelling provided support for a two-factor solution reflecting entitativity and group structure as subdimensions of groupness. The groupness factors were differentially associated with theoretically relevant aspects of classes (e.g. synchronised movement), the individual (e.g. number of members interacted with), as well as group cohesion. Groupness also predicted perceived exertion and affect. Conclusion: Our research provides support for a brief measure of groupness, advances theory related to how individuals perceive exercise groups, and provides evidence regarding how broader experiences during exercise may relate to exercisers’ perceptions of groupness.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85060792606&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85060792606&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/08870446.2019.1566548

DO - 10.1080/08870446.2019.1566548

M3 - Article

VL - 34

SP - 715

EP - 732

JO - Psychology and Health

JF - Psychology and Health

SN - 0887-0446

IS - 6

ER -